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Links 1 through 10 of 4573 David Bausola's Bookmarks

This is really, really good both as culture (I defy you to read it and not smile at least) and as technical and legal systems.

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There’s a lot of weirdness in the computer music community around this. RJDJ is a port of the free PureData language to the iphone. Many of those involved are free software developers, but have to give up all their rights to RJDJ, a venture capital funded company. RJDJ in turn license the code back to them under the GPLv3. This means they are free to change and run the code under open operating systems, but not on the iphone. This is weird, using the GPLv3 as a firewall to protect commercial interests on a closed platform, while exploiting the work of a free software community.

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Well, things have changed , or rather evolved on Twitter, to more complex forms, compared to its beginning when people were happy, just tweeting. Not any more. We build hashtags, we build communities, we build rankings..and we have re-tweets, the most happening thing on Twitter.

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I think there's a billion-dollar business resident in Shirky's thoughts, business that Google is missing with its focus on "search." The best emphasis should be on "finding," not searching. The need is for filters of a more refined, catered kind.

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This essay uses the late work of Ludwig Wittgenstein to reformulate the traditional distinction between story and narrative discourse, or diegetic and extra-diegetic levels of narrative, as a distinction between story and narrative act. In describing the transformations performed by the narrative act, the author elaborates the principle of narrative uncertainty, which dictates that the more definite the account of story or plot, the more indefinite the account of the narrative act -- and vice versa. In this conceptual framework, the essay then characterizes the narrative act as the differential, within a given fictional text, of two of more types of stories (or plots), and articulates the relationship between narrative act, narrator, and cultural context.

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But, like Herman, what I find most useful is Lodge's nuanced approach to the different perspectives--narrator's and characters'--to explain the story's dynamics. Lodge's description is mostly accurate and certainly comprehensive, and my own ac count of the filtration in the story is only meant as a supplement. But I wish to emphasize an important aspect of filtration that figures largely in this story. That is what can be called "shading" or "blending" or "softening" of filters. A character's filter is rarely an unmixed or homogenous phenomenon. Often it mingles with another character's filter and/or the narrator's slant. And it may oscillate among perceptual, cognitive, and what I've called interest aspects, that is, the reader's inference about a character's general welfare. To put it in other terms, filter does not always "toggle," that is, operate in an on-off manner, like an electrical switch. It seems rather a question of dosage or nuance, or in Lodge's term "degree." In this sto

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David Herman introduces his collection Narratologies with a citation from David Lodge's essay on Hemingway's "Cat in the Rain." Lodge's essay posed a question of continuing relevance, namely, can narratology help readers achieve more refined interpretations? Contemporary narratology, as represented in Herman's book, seems to reverse the issue, arguing that interpretations, variable as they may be, play an important role in narrative analysis, not only in determining plots, characters, and setting, but also in shaping our understanding of the discourse itself.

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Abstract This paper investigates the impact of Web. 2.0 technologies on the ways learning can be conceived of as a narrative process within contemporary contexts, using blogs as an illustrative example. It is premised on the concept of narrative as a way in which individuals represent and organize experience in order to learn from it and make it shareable with others within social contexts. The first part of the paper offers a theoretical analysis of the role of narrative in the social construction of knowledge by the ways it enables users of Web 2.0 technologies to participate meaningfully in the exchange of experiences and ideas. The second part of the paper offers a 'situated' analysis of the narrative practices engaged with by users of blogs. A 'narrative trail' is used to provide a contextualized instance of the narrative practices which are involved. The paper concludes by examining the research issues which are raised and suggests a research agenda which is needed to explore We

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The Wharton paper also explores how consumers branch out from hits to discover more obscure products. Netessine says the research indicates that "primitive" recommendation systems are likely to blame for the delay in lesser known products becoming available and consumers finding their way toward them. "Many recommendation systems are not terribly smart," Netessine states, adding that recommendations about films are made to Netflix subscribers who view similar films. But in order for a film to be recommended, it must be viewed in the first place. "If you want to see the long tail effect -- consumers going into those obscure products -- you have to be sure consumers learn about them, and that's not easy. Current tools may not be good enough."

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