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Links 1 through 10 of 382 by Wayne Marshall tagged tech

'Two years ago, on January 13, 2014, the Vine account Fab Cheerleader posted a video captioned “He hit the sign

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classic piece by Louis Chude-Sokei on reggae, technology, and diaspora (hip-hop)

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series of deep dives on (making of) various popular recordings

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'...no one sold the ocean until Irv Teibel.

If you flip on a waterfall to fall asleep, if you keep rainymood.com in your bookmarks, if you associate well-being with the sound of streams and crickets or wonder why the beach never quite sounds as tranquil as you imagine, it's because of Teibel. New York's least likely media mogul was the mastermind behind Environments, a series of records he swore were "The Future of Music." From 1969 to 1979, he took the best parts of nature, turned them up to 11, engraved them on 12-inch records, and sold them back to us by the millions. He had a musician's ear, an artist's heart, and a salesman's tongue, and his work lives on in yoga studios, Skymall catalogs, and the sea-blue eyes of Brian Eno. If you haven't heard of him, it's only because he designed his own legacy to be invisible.

This is the story of a man who tried to capture the world, and really wanted us to listen.'

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' “Multimodality and Lyric Sound,” reframes how we consider the lyric from England to Spain, from the twelfth through the sixteenth centuries, pushing ideas of openness, flexibility, and productive creativity.
...
“Playing the Medieval English Lyric” briefly examines the emergence of the lyric form in 13th-century miscellanies—an emergence that, in many ways, mirrors the development of mashups like “Call Me a Hole.” This work dovetails with larger critical issues apparent in deeply examining the material culture of miscellanies—medieval anthologies—how they were made, their quire formations, their marginalia, their scribes, their audiences. But I juxtapose this investigation with the insights of more recent theoretical ideas about multimodality, remediation, and mashup. Both recent digital rhetoric and medieval rhetorical theory can help us think through the place of music in the emergence of new literary genres and contextualize the creation of new technologies of sound.'

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Q: So how is it that Caribbean music, rather than what we traditionally think of as “Brazilian music, ” took off in Belém?

A: The story is often told the following way: That short-wave radio was used to pick up Caribbean frequencies because radio broadcasts from the south of Brazil arrived with bad reception.

I think that’s part of the story. I think an important piece of the puzzle is the sound-system institution, which begins in the 1950s and ‘60s with people simply hooking up turntables to loud speakers. These sound systems began to proliferate in Belém’s residential neighborhoods, and one way they found to compete with one another was to spin exclusive records, the harder to come by, the better.

A lot of the albums that sound systems played were being brought by contrabandists to Belém. They had never been released in Brazil before, so the sound systems would use these albums to do what they call fazer farol—to shine a spotlight or a beacon that would attract audiences.

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fascinating possibility! 'Despite revealing to Engadget that the Eddie Cochran and Sex Pistol rumors are false, she did admit the preset was based on a rock track. A British rock record from the 70s is all she would confirm. “You would immediately notice it once you hear the song.” I don’t have contact information for Hiroko Okuda, but I am positive that the track she is referring to is “Hang Onto Yourself” by David Bowie. If there’s another “British rock record from the 70s” that sounds more like Sleng Teng, I’d like to hear it. So, the history of the song that started a new era in Jamaican music can be traced back to David Bowie. I’m not saying this is anything more than an accident of circumstance, but I have a feeling that the more one examine’s Bowie’s career, the more such accidents one will find. '

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great piece on the origins of the sleng teng pre-set: 'Hiroko Okuda started at Casio in 1980, straight after graduating in Musicology from Tokyo's Kunitachi College of Music. She remains at Casio to this day, but the MT40 was the first project she worked on. Despite creating that rock preset, she has no idea where the Eddie Cochran rumor came from, or why it's so persistent. Okuda is also keen to point out that most people assume the preset was taken out of musical context by King Jammy and co., this giving the story half of its charm. A misused rock rhythm, birthing reggae's monster riddim. But again, the real story is stranger than the legend.'

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'Definitions can be slippery, but the roots of electronic rabòday can be found in rara, a music older than Haiti itself. It began with the indigenous Taíno people, mixed with rhythms brought from Africa by slaves, and eventually morphed and modernized into a style that today is played by roving musicians throughout the country. … Drum rhythms have names and contexts, many that can be traced back to the distinct African peoples that fused together to form Haiti, and “rabòday” is the name of one that’s long been favored by these rara bands. In recent years, a new electronic incarnation of rabòday — digitized and crunched with frenetic urgency — exploded to become one of the defining sounds of a young, disaster-surviving generation of Haitians.'

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'There’s a saying that “it’s not the tool, it’s the artist.” In the case of FL Studio, though, you could argue that the tool helped shape the artists just as much as the artists helped popularise the tool. Despite its modest beginnings in Europe’s bureaucratic heart, FL Studio – formerly known as FruityLoops – became the defining music software of the ‘00s.'

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