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Links 1 through 10 of 15 by Wayne Marshall tagged brooklyn

'Like reggaeton’s use of the Dembow riddim and Baltimore club's reliance on the “Sing Sing” break, flex tunes revolve around a chopped-up instrumental called the “Volume” riddim, from the early 2000s. A handful of other riddims and samples from the same era are commonly used too, most of them ranging in tempo from 98 to 105 bpm, and lazer-like blip effects run through many of the tracks, often taking the place of snares.
...
Though its roots stretch back to Jamaica in the early 1990s, flexing grew up in the heart of Brooklyn. It became a distinct dance style of its own in the mid-'00s, defined by elements like bone breaking, an unimaginable contortions of the arms. There's also gliding, a trick of the feet, like an advanced moonwalk; pausing, where a dancer will move in animated motions, stopping at sharp intervals as if they are hitting invisible walls; and connecting, where every movement must come in contact with a different body part—the hand instigating the elbow, setting off the shoulder, and so on. Flexers also use moves found in other styles, but it’s the level of involvement in this close-knit world that determines whether a dancer is considered a true participant as opposed to someone just using flexing elements for their own purposes.

The music began as dense dancehall mixes, with layers of riddims and sound effects filling up entire cassette tapes. Then they shortened to the time of dancers' showcases, and eventually boiled down to regular track-length mixes with their own names. In the past five years or so, producers have started coming up with flex tunes from scratch, creating new dancehall riddims full of booming 808s, pulsing electronics, and chopped vocal samples.'

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'Super Power held the title as the best record store in NY for a long stretch of time under the rule of the great Count Shelly. After he returned to Jamaica the store was run by the remaining family in NY, and it gradually faded away until its doors finally closed with a whisper in 2008. During it’s impressive 20 odd year run they operated as a record shop, distributor, and label. As a label Super Power released the bulk of Jammy$ catalog in the eighties, as well as other top producers throughout the eighties and nineties. They also produced their own material which were released on the Shelly’s Records label, and spawned groundbreaking hits like Louie Rankin’s “Typewriter”…really the best example of early nineties NY dancehall, bridging the gap between hip hop and reggae. …You would have to fight to get a spot at the counter, and you would always see the biggest NY sounds like Addies, Afrique, LP, Libra Love, and even visiting sounds from Jamaica would have to go to Super Power…'

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'I remember when kids here used to joke us out. For being Haitian. “Coconuts” is what they called us. When being Jamaican was that shit. Being down with Haiti seems to be in fashion these days. Gotta thank Wyclef for that. Zoe Pound too. They don’t talk that coconut shit no more, especially when we roll through massive on the Parkway, at that Labor Day Parade.'

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audio recording my nov 09 talk @ MIT: 'What can we learn about contemporary culture from watching dayglo-clad teenagers dancing geekily in front of their computers in such disparate sites as Brooklyn, Buenos Aires, Johannesburg, and Mexico City? How has the embrace of "new media" by so-called "digital natives" facilitated the formation of transnational, digital publics? More important, what are the local effects of such practices, and why do they seem to generate such hostile responses and anxiety about the future?'

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"tight pants don't make you a shotta"

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reggae in japan stats: 'Not only does the music work, it sells. Fireball, a Japanese dancehall reggae group, had 2,500 fans turn out for a show in Tokyo this past spring, a number any Jamaican reggae star would aspire to, in New York or otherwise. And in August 2008, 40,000 Japanese reggae fans converged on Yokohama Stadium for the Yokohama Reggae Sai ("Sai" meaning "Bash"), an annual event hosted by Mighty Crown—a top-tier sound system internationally, and the pride of the Japanese reggae scene. The event included just three Jamaican acts alongside 14 Japanese headliners, like Fireball, Ryu the Skywalker, and Rankin Taxi. Dancehall star Mr. Vegas was one of the three Jamaican invitees and said afterward that it was "indisputably" the largest crowd he'd ever performed for. Yokohama Reggae Sai 2009 is set for September 5, and will again feature only three Jamaican acts.'

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amazing collection of 80s north american reggae sound tapes, from boston to bronx to philly to toronto to san diego

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as has been pointed out, this video is tres cool (and it's even cooler that the maker released the source code) :: what was striking to me tho, natch, is how jay reps the BK inna JA accent during the first verse -- that sort of thing is pretty unremarkable at this point, which is, in its own right, remarkable

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