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Links 1 through 10 of 13658 Vinicius Latorre's Bookmarks

Mutation testing is a fault-based software testing technique to measure the quality of a test suite depending on its ability to detect faults in the code. This technique has been applied to an assortment of languages of very diverse nature since its inception in the late 1970s. However, the researchers have postponed its development around C++ in favor of other mainstream languages. This paper aims to survey the mutation testing research regarding C++, studying the existing tools and approaches. To the same extent, we discuss the different aspects that should be taken into account in the construction of a comprehensive mutation tool for this language, from the analysis of the code to the execution of the mutants. In addition, we expound how the technique can be assessed so that it can contribute effectively in the composition of a complete test suite. The findings in this paper pose that the construction of a mutation tool for this language is complex, but still realizable.

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TTF Text Rendering for Unity3d

This is the source code of the Unity TTF Text plugin, and related open source modules. TTF Text is opensource since 28/02/2015.

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Simple way to communicate and nothing extra.
New design, group chats and much more!

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ICQ for Linux is compiled by Qt creator or qmake, so you need to prepare Qt environment first.

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Zephyr Project is a small, scalable real-time operating system for use on resource-constrained systems supporting multiple architectures. Developers are able to tailor their optimal solution. As a true open source project, the community can evolve the Zephyr Project to support new hardware, developer tools, sensor and device drivers. Advancements in security, device management capabilities, connectivity stacks and file systems can be easily implemented.

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Pistache is a C++ REST framework written by Mathieu Stefani at Datacratic. It is written in pure C++11 with no external dependency and provides a low-level HTTP abstraction.

Pistache provides both an HTTP client and server that can be used to create and query complex web and REST APIs.

It’s completly free and Apache-licensed.

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Texture setup in modern OpenGL is nearly equivalent to what you are used to in the fixed-function API. You still have to enable your texture units, create and configure your texture objects (including mipmap chains), upload texture data to them, bind them to a texture target and configure texture coordinates on your vertices as attribute data. However, glTexEnv, glTexGen and the texture matrix stack have been removed.

glTexEnv must be replaced by code in the fragment shader.

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In our last blog, we re-implemented the famous OpenGL triangle in world space and compared and contrasted the fixed-function GLUT program with an equivalent Modern OpenGL program. We covered how to use Qt's math functions to replace the matrix mode that was removed from Fixed-Function OpenGL and replaced with code you write in your vertex shader. We talked about the Model, View, Projection idioms and how you can use uniforms to pass these variables (and others) to your shaders programs between draw calls. Next up, we're going to talk about OpenGL lighting , it's origins and theory and how to implement that theory in your shader programs.

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This is the second of a four part blog series, in which we compare and contrast Fixed-Function OpenGL with Modern OpenGL and introduce you to the issues involved in porting your code to Modern OpenGL.

Last time we covered the necessary steps you need to create the famous OpenGL triangle with the modern API. We've introduced shaders and described their inputs and outputs along with various Qt convenience objects that make working with the new modern API easier. In Part 2, we move from clip-space to world space and go over the modern replacements for the GL_MODELVIEW and GL_PROJECTION matrix stacks and then port this example to world space.

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In this first of a four part blog series, we outline differences between Fixed-Function OpenGL with Modern OpenGL and show effective solutions for common issues encountered when porting your code to Modern OpenGL.

In this series of blog posts, I am going to try to help you avoid the “gotchas” that kept me from my beauty sleep by discussing the basic things you need to do to get rendering going in OpenGL 3.3 (or OpenGL ES 2.0) from the perspective of porting a fixed-function application.

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