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Links 1 through 10 of 26 by Edward Vielmetti tagged prediction

NextBus uses Global Position Satellite (GPS) technology and advanced computer modeling to track buses and streetcars on their routes. Taking into account the actual position of the transit vehicles, their intended stops, and the typical traffic patterns, NextBus estimates the bus arrivals with a high degree of accuracy. This estimate is updated constantly as the vehicles are tracked. The NextBus system is covered by U.S. Patents 6,006,159 and 6,374,176. The system is also produced under license from ArrivalStar, Inc. U.S. Patents 5,623,260; 6,411,891; 6,317,060; 6,415,207; 6,313,760 and 6,278,936.

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Prof. Panarin, 50 years old, is not a fringe figure. A former KGB analyst, he is dean of the Russian Foreign Ministry's academy for future diplomats. He is invited to Kremlin receptions, lectures students, publishes books, and appears in the media as an expert on U.S.-Russia relations.

But it's his bleak forecast for the U.S. that is music to the ears of the Kremlin, which in recent years has blamed Washington for everything from instability in the Middle East to the global financial crisis. Mr. Panarin's views also fit neatly with the Kremlin's narrative that Russia is returning to its rightful place on the world stage after the weakness of the 1990s, when many feared that the country would go economically and politically bankrupt and break into separate territories.

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We are in a historic moment of horse-versus-locomotive competition, where intuitive and experiential expertise is losing out time and time again to a new kind of statistical analysis. The same principles apply, as I demonstrate in my book Super Crunchers, to economic forecasters, wine connoisseurs predicting the future prices of vintages and Hollywood producers deciding whether to "green-light" a script. Huge data sets of digital information are allowing a new breed of number cruncher to discover empirical correlations between seemingly unrelated things.

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Ian Ayres is a lawyer and an economist. He is the William K. Townsend Professor at Yale Law School and a Professor at Yale's School of Management. (Ayres Resume)

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We develop an algorithm for predicting the arrival times of a transit vehicle at signalized intersections, with a focus on meeting the accuracy requirement associated with signal priority control applications. The algorithm uses both historical and real-time Global Positioning System (GPS) vehicle location data. There are no data from other detectors, such as loops or cameras. The arrival time prediction is formulated as an optimal a posteriori parameter estimation problem, where the model is consisted of a historical model and an adaptive model that adaptively adjusts its filter gain based on real-time data. The estimates generated by these two models are fused in a weighted average derived from the solution of the parameter estimation problem. The prediction algorithm adaptively adjusts its weight distribution using error variances obtained from the two models.

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Back in May 1993, as a medical resident at the University of Arizona, Mark Smolinski volunteered for a shift with the state's Department of Health. Right after he started, Arizona and neighboring states were struck by a deadly outbreak of an unidentified respiratory illness. The young doctor found himself face-to-face with an emerging epidemic, part of a team that spent sleepless months struggling to contain the outbreak. "I was going from hospital to hospital trying to determine the patients' exposures," he recalls of his harrowing first assignment. "Almost all the cases were under the age of 30, and it had a very high mortality rate."

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Harvard psychologist Daniel Gilbert has made it his life's work to understand why people not only make errors in predicting what will make them happy, but also why they make the same errors over and over again.

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comprehensive list of polls, polling, and vote information on a state by state basis.

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awesome weather map meta-information and predictions + storm reports + damage reports

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