Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share This URL With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

Links 1 through 10 of 74 by Vance Stevens tagged blogging

Sense-making with PKM "set of processes individually constructed to help the flow from implicit to explicit knowledge." Managing the flow of knowledge, "akes more time than many of us have," and "The lines between learning and working are getting blurred."
Flow of knowledge needs to make implicit knowledge explicit through Internal (How do I deal with this) and External (who can I work with on this) processes. Entails a continuous loop of 4 elements: Internally sort, categorize, make explicit, retrieve; and externally Connect / Exchange / Contribute. This enables one to observe, reflect, put tentative thoughts out; and read, listen, converse, reflect
more about attitude than a set of tools, but the presentation shows what tools go with which part of the flow 
PKM is "part of a social learning contract" where We have "obligation" to participate so that we can learn from each other. "Cooperation is the glue that holds together the important social networks in which we work and live"

Share It With Others!

I’ve concluded that most of the hype around social media is nonsense and that people, particularly the self-proclaimed social media elite are clothing-less. Sure, I’ll still continue to participate in those spaces periodically – as soon as this post is done, I’ll tweet it and share it on G+. Beyond that, however, social media is getting credit for things it’s merely flowing, not actually creating.

Share It With Others!

Jane PetringTeacher, Collège Édouard-Montpetit
The vast array of free online tools that allow users to combine images, video, music, voice and text have spurred a wave of digital storytelling as the ancient art of weaving a good yarn is reinvented for the digital age. While I was experimenting with some of these e-tools, I thought it would be interesting to find ways for students to explore literature and their own beliefs from different points of view. I have selected two assignments I used with advanced-level students that worked well to improve writing and pronunciation skills: character blogs and This I Believe recordings.
Character Blogs
I have used blogs in my classes in various ways over the last seven years. This time my goal was to have students crawl inside a piece of literature and write a blog post from a character's point of view.

Share It With Others!

One of the sites Nik Peachey showed us during his April 10 2011 session with learning2gether

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Sarah Sutter explains how she introduced and implemented blogs in her class; nice comprehensive explanation

Share It With Others!

Welcome to the original Learning 2.0 Program. This site was created to support PLCMC's Learning 2.0 Program; a discovery learning program designed to encourage staff to explore new technologies and reward them for doing 23 Things. Since the program's launched, it has fostered Learning 2.0 programs all over the world. If you are interested in duplicating or modifying this program for your organization, please see Program Notes on About Page and contact Helene Blowers for information.

Share It With Others!

Blogging at East Side Community HS, NYC
My video blog of working with students at East Side Community High School, New York City.

Share It With Others!

learner-writers learned to see their blogs as opportunities for true communication instead of written pieces for their teacher to mark. One trainee added a visitors map to her template, and comments about the number and diverse origins of the silent visitors she kept getting were frequent among class members. Another teacher-to-be was, during a job interview, asked to submit some work she’d done, and she told us she’d proudly considered her Ethics blog as clear her evidence of who she was, both as a human being and at a professional level.

Alejandra de Antoni: her words have definitely made it beyond school walls. Two of her entries at her Ethics blog (on Savater’s Ethics for Amador) were selected by the editor of a bilingual e-zine (”Yareah“), and you can already see her work published at:
http://sn.im/tklh8. Needless to say, Alejandra has been quite surprised by this unexpected recognition of the value of her words.

Share It With Others!

elementary student blogging with our guest Jan Smith, a sixth grade teachers in British Columbia, Huzzah! http://huzzah.edublogs.org/ She started with a strictly controled class blog, but found that it lacked conversational give and take. She started again with an edublogs account, and this time she encouraged a more "conversational" approach both in student's writing, giving them a voice, and how they interacted with each other. She started a practice of "gradual release" giving students more authority, and control over their blogging and blogs as they showed responsibility until many had earned their own blogs and were self-moderated. She also shared how she dealt with problems and conflicts when they came up, respecting students, and making them responsible.

Share It With Others!