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URL: http://laphamsquarterly.org/foreigners/foreign-spell

The Foreign Spell | Lapham’s Quarterly

The foreign has long been my stomping ground, my sanctuary, as one who grew up a foreigner wherever I happened to be. Born to Indian parents in Oxford, England, I was seven when my parents moved to California; by the third grade, I was a foreigner on all three of the continents that might have claimed me—a little Indian boy with an English accent and an American green card. Foreignness became not just my second home, but my theme, my fascination, a way of looking at every place as many locals could not. As some are born with the blessing of beauty or a musical gift, as some can run very fast without seeming to try, so I was given from birth, I felt, the benefit of being on intimate terms with outsiderdom.

It’s fashionable in some circles to talk of Otherness as a burden to be borne, and there will always be some who feel threatened by—and correspondingly hostile to—anyone who looks and sounds different from themselves. But in my experience, foreignness can as often be an asset. The outsider enjoys a kind of diplomatic immunity in many places, and if he seems witless or alien to some, he will seem glamorous and exotic to as many others. In open societies like California, someone with Indian features such as mine is a target of positive discrimination, as strangers ascribe to me yogic powers or Vedic wisdom that couldn’t be further from my background (or my interest).

Besides, the very notion of the foreign has been shifting in our age of constant movement, with more than fifty million refugees; every other Torontonian you meet today is what used to be called a foreigner, and the number of people living in lands they were not born to will surpass 300 million in the next generation. Soon there’ll be more foreigners on earth than there are Americans.

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Comments

Vielleicht wäre es zur Abwechslung ja mal wichtig, den Wert der Assimilationsverweigerung zu benennen: http://t.co/5y7CfVYNvZ

To be a foreigner is to be perpetually detached, but it is also to be continually surprised.

The outsider perspective part of being foreign is examined.

The Foreign Spell http://t.co/Sg92wiiq5F

"To be a foreigner is to be perpetually detached, but it is also to be continually surprised." http://t.co/U8xYb1zLb4