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Links 1 through 10 of 2810 Justin Souter's Bookmarks

Think about technology startup hubs in the UK, and the Silicon Roundabout and Tech City in London come to mind. But Newcastle has quietly built a reputation among entrepreneurs as the place to launch their businesses. A city once dominated by heavy industry offers not just an alternative, but for a growing number it is the preferred location over an over-crowded capital. Many of the startup founders come from all over the UK and abroad to participate in the country's first £1m accelerator programme, Ignite 100. But almost as many stay because of lower costs of living and a tight-knit network of fellow entrepreneurs and investors. "We are at the point where we've got critical mass in that there's a group of startups that feed off each other," said Richard Exley, an investment manager with NorthStar Ventures. "There is a sense now of building something rather than just being a part of something."

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"The motivations of these fellow travellers vary. Delight in associating with a star of the anti-American crowd is clearly simple snobbery. The narcissism with which someone like Penn preens himself as though on the world’s widest stage is also clear. Posturing and self-promotion is good for business, and agents have to be kept up to the mark. Like their predecessors, this new generation of fellow travellers spin illusion and misrepresent reality. I may be wrong, but I detect the deep and secret pull of power. Whatever their differences of character, these people aspire to be on the side of a strong man who dares to do what they would like to do but haven’t the courage. Like Cubans in the recent past, huge -numbers of Venezuelans haven’t waited to test the Chávista limits but have fled the country. About half of those who remain do not wear a red shirt and very much hope that it will not be long before Chávez and his claque are no longer able to do them further injuries."

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As an entrepreneur, I encourage you to reject the notion of a classical business plan from the 1970′s. You should still thinking deeply about the business you are creating and communicate clearly what you are doing to investors – just use contemporary approaches that are much more deeply incorporated into the actual creation of your product and business.

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But as these three fundamental lessons show, it can be a manageable process with the potential for significant rewards. In fact, it’s been my experience that once companies start investing in analytics, they almost never stop. The things they learn drive improvements in the business that more than pay for the effort. Analytics becomes a self-funding way for companies to improve their position in the market.
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It's day one at the Singularity University: the opening address has just been delivered by a hologram. Craig Venter, who was one of the first scientists to sequence the human genome and created the first synthetic life form, is up next. And later, we will see two people, paralysed from the waist down, use robotic exoskeletons to rise up and walk.

But first, the co-founder of the Singularity University, Peter Diamandis, gives us our instructions for the day. Your task, he says, is to pick one of the "grand challenges of humanity" – the lack of clean drinking water, say. And then come up with an idea that "can positively impact the lives of a billion people".

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What distinguishes great entrepreneurs? Discussions of entrepreneurial psychology typically focus on creativity, tolerance for risk, and the desire for achievement—enviable traits that, unfortunately, are not very teachable. So Saras Sarasvathy, a professor at the University of Virginia's Darden School of Business, set out to determine how expert entrepreneurs think, with the goal of transferring that knowledge to aspiring founders. While still a graduate student at Carnegie Mellon, Sarasvathy—with the guidance of her thesis supervisor, the Nobel laureate Herbert Simon—embarked on an audacious project: to eavesdrop on the thinking of the country's most successful entrepreneurs as they grappled with business problems. She required that her subjects have at least 15 years of entrepreneurial experience, have started multiple companies—both successes and failures—and have taken at least one company public.

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Brad Feld knows what it takes to create an entrepreneurial community in any city, at any time. “Startup communities” are popping up everywhere, from cities like Boulder to Boston and even in countries such as Iceland. Startup Communities by Brad Feld documents the buzz, strategy, long-term perspective, and dynamics of building communities of entrepreneurs who can feed off of each other’s talent, creativity, and support.

For an in depth review of the talk, check out GeekWire’s post: VC Brad Feld: Startup hubs need to be led by entrepreneurs. Also, tune into Brad’s ongoing coverage of Startup Communities via Brad Feld’s blog, StartupRev.

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That was the first I heard of Brad Feld and has since become a source of inspiration and guidance for my community efforts. Startup Communities is the first of the Startup Revolution book series underway. Brad writes, “my hometown of Boulder has become known throughout the world as a great startup community, but cities like New York, Boston, Seattle, Portland, Chicago and Austin were being known as nexuses of startup activity.” Here are my favorite take-aways from this densely packed, 14 chapter guide book on building an entrepreneurial ecosystem in your city:

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This is the second post in the series of Tips and and Tricks for passing the Google Analytics Inidividual Qualification (GAIQ). The following notes were extracted from the Google’s Conversion University test preparation presentation (where possible), and are not my property. They have been reproduced below to help those during the Google Analytics Individual Qualification (GAIQ). The following books are also a great help to successfully passing the test:

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