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Links 1 through 10 of 551 Keith Toussaint's Bookmarks

A big-data revolution is under way in health care. Start with the vastly increased supply of information. Over the last decade, pharmaceutical companies have been aggregating years of research and development data into medical databases, while payors and providers have digitized their patient records. Meanwhile, the US federal government and other public stakeholders have been opening their vast stores of health-care knowledge, including data from clinical trials and information on patients covered under public insurance programs. In parallel, recent technical advances have made it easier to collect and analyze information from multiple sources—a major benefit in health care, since data for a single patient may come from various payors, hospitals, laboratories, and physician offices.

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The HBR Insight Center highlights emerging thinking around today's most important business ideas. In this Insight Center, we'll focus on what senior executives need to know about the Big Data revolution.

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The triage theory (Ames, BN (2006) PNAS 103-­‐17589-­‐94) posits that the spectrum of functions for a particular vitamin or mineral (V/M) are managed by the organism such that, when micronutrient availability is limited, functions required for short-­‐term survival take precedence over functions whose loss can be better tolerated (e.g. by selection for micronutrient binding constants or targeted tissue distribution). Ames proposed that a consequence of this evolutionary adaptation is an increase in the risk of chronic diseases of aging when V/M availability is limited. That nature may have developed such a system is logically consistent with an important evolutionary theory that natural selection favors short-­‐term survival for reproduction over long-­‐term health [e.g, Kirkwood (2008) J Intern Med 2:117-­‐27].

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(08/05/2012) Denmark, England and Scotland have been pioneers in the use of electronic communication in and across the health and social care sectors. The three pioneers have been able to integrate telehealth into standard patient treatments, according to a new study from the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (IPTS)

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Edison’s approach was an early example of what is now called “design thinking”—a methodology that imbues the full spectrum of innovation activities with a human-centered design ethos. By this I mean that innovation is powered by a thorough understanding, through direct observation, of what people want and need in their lives and what they like or dislike about the way particular products are made, packaged, marketed, sold, and supported.

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Recently, Kevin McCullagh of British product strategy consultancy, Plan organized a two-day event for executives to wrap their heads around the concept of design thinking?and, in particular, to think about how they might go about implementing it within their own organization. Kevin invited me along to give an overview of some of the things I've been thinking recently. "Don't hold back," he advised. So I came up with a talk entitled, "Design Thinking Won't Save You" ...

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Why am I, who at Business Week was one of Design Thinking's major advocates, moving on to a new conceptual framework? Simple. Design Thinking has given the design profession and society at large all the benefits it has to offer and is beginning to ossify and actually do harm. Helen Walters, my wonderful colleague at Business Week, lays out many of the pros and cons of Design Thinking in her post on her blog.

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Living Lab Denmark is a user-centred cross-organizational ecosystem which is centred in Odense and The Region of Southern Denmark. Companies, researchers and end-users participate in dynamic private-public collaborations to innovate new products and solutions that assist or automate tasks in healthcare and homecare. Hospitals and municipalities test and imple- ment new solutions, and the region is leading within telemedicine.

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Living Lab Denmark is a user-centred cross-organizational ecosystem which is centred in Odense and The Region of Southern Denmark. Companies, researchers and end-users participate in dynamic private-public collaborations to innovate new products and solutions that assist or automate tasks in healthcare and homecare. Hospitals and municipalities test and implement new solutions, and the region is leading within telemedicine.

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Guidelines, order sets, protocols and more.

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