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1-10 of Christy Keeler's Bookmarks with the Tag Bundle WebsiteType

This is the homepage for educational resources available from and about the Federal Reserve. It includes resources such as lesson plans and resource guides to accompany videos including "In Plain English: Making Sense of the Federal Reserve."

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This website provides resources to assist students appreciate Muslims living in the US. The available videos teach that Muslims are "regular" Americans and shouldn't be seen as outsiders. It helps viewers appreciate all Americans for their common citizenship and compassionate beings.

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"On the Shoulders of Giants" is a book written by Kareem Abdul-Jbbar about 20th century Harlem and a related documentary video. It appreciates the history from myriad perspectives including the arts, sports, and civics. The site includes videos from the movie as well as content information and teaching resources.

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This is a PDF version of a booklet on using primary sources in the classroom. It discusses strengths and benefits of numerous artifact types (e.g., documents, advertisements), provides worksheets to guide students through source analysis, and includes lesson plans using Smithsonian artifacts. This could serve as an excellent resource when engaged in professional development relating to primary sources.

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From the Smithsonian's Museum of American History, this site uses textual and visual cues to have students learn about roles of a variety of people during the Civil War. Students read an excerpt about a particular person and drag items they think would relate to that person into an "Evidence" box. Upon doing so, they are told if they are correct or incorrect and provided with additional information.

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This site focuses on the trade of glass beads. The site provides a detailed introduction into bead trading and their use as a cultural expression. It provides information on the sites and sources for glass beads. The discussion is furthered with information on how some of the glass beads were made. It also includes information on the cultural and economic purposes of bead trade among Native Americans.

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This site offers an excerpt from a book called "The Book of the Navajo." It describes differences between the Navajo and white man's views on slavery in the 1800's.

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This is a website for researching the specific history, geneology, or ancestry of Africans in Louisiana. The site includes innumerable primary source documents (birth and death notes, occupations, family and community histories). This is a great website for specific and in depth research about a certain person, family, or to see examples of documents buying and selling slaves and for connecting ethnic backgrounds between families and groups.

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This is a PBS series that a teacher can use to show portions for background building or for visual learning. The series focuses on different eras of African life in America beginning with the first arrival in the Americas. The series includes materials, video, and pictures which integrate with lessons on these topics.

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Gullah was a language created and used throughout the southern coast (specifically South Carolina area) and used by slaves there who were self-taught. This is a great resource to connect to a study on early slave culture and relates to the connections developed between Native Americans and early slaves.

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