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Links 1 through 10 of 20 by Christy Keeler tagged Tutorials

From the Smithsonian's Museum of American History, this site uses textual and visual cues to have students learn about roles of a variety of people during the Civil War. Students read an excerpt about a particular person and drag items they think would relate to that person into an "Evidence" box. Upon doing so, they are told if they are correct or incorrect and provided with additional information.

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This is actually an "online class" provided by the National Parks System. It includes key points and objectives designed to lead students to an understanding of African American culture and contributions. There are excellent pages on "Module One" which define African cultural heritage within distinct regions, and provide specfic examples of daily life and first person narratives.

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This website is both for teacher and student use. It provides lesson plans for teaching social studies and geography with a Native American theme. It is divided into 5 core concepts and has many links to tribal information.

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This site features a lesson plan where students research indigenous peoples in two different geographic areas, comparing and contrasting specific facets of their lifestyles, customs, and culture and analyzing how these elements may have been shaped by the people’s response to the climate and environment. Student groups create a multimedia presentation that compares peoples in northern and southern sections of the western hemisphere and their connections to the respective climates. Students compare and contrast different dwellings and their connection to the environment. The site includes step-by-step directions for creating multimedia projects, templates, and a detailed resource list including books, music, and multimedia sources.

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This site contains dozens of wonderful photos of Native American women and their families throughout history. It would be very useful in helping to provide background information during a lesson on Native Americans.

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This site details wedding traditions throughout varied Native American tribes. It would be very useful as background information during a Native American unit.

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This site shows dioramas of Native American living environments including the Iroquois Longhouse, Lakota Tipi, Eastern Wigwam, Pueblo House, and Eskimo Igloo. The site also includes a link to a teacher resource site for free downloadable patterns so students can make paper models of the different kinds of houses. This site is valuable because it dispels the popular myth that all Native Americans live in tepees.

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This website is the reprint of an article on Native American women, previously written for the OAH Magazine of History. It provides a good overview of the role of women in different tribes throughout history. It would be useful as background information in a lesson on Native American women.

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This website is one part of the National Women's History Project and provides an informative quiz (with answers) that can be used in the classroom to promote the study of women in Native American history.

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This game is designed for students learning about adobe style homes. The game tests the understanding of the steps in the Adobe building process. Upon entering the site, users are presented with the fifteen steps of building an Adobe house. The steps are out of order. The task is to select each step in its correct order.

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