Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 106 by Christy Keeler tagged Native_American_Economies

This site focuses on the trade of glass beads. The site provides a detailed introduction into bead trading and their use as a cultural expression. It provides information on the sites and sources for glass beads. The discussion is furthered with information on how some of the glass beads were made. It also includes information on the cultural and economic purposes of bead trade among Native Americans.

Share It With Others!

This web page provides information about the origins of logging. It ties in the role of colonist and Jamestown. It also discusses how wars increased the need for lumber. This site would be good for a student web quest activity at a 5th grade level or higher. Students would have to read the article and sift through the details to get the information. The site also has a video on current day logging.

Share It With Others!

This website focuses on trade patterns primarily in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The focus is on a place known as “the great carrying place,” a transshipment point where the company headquarters and warehouses of the North West and XY Companies were located. Grand Portage was a trading post located in the midst of a Native community, where company employees wintered, trading with surrounding Ojibwe, also known as the Anishinaabe. The study details how trade patterns at this location impacted the surrounding areas. The document also includes information on how many furs were traded for certain goods and the economic impact of fur trade. This site is very detailed. A good place to pull of information to share with the class, tables students in a 5th grade class could read or as a research document for higher level classes.

Share It With Others!

This web page provides information about the origins of logging. It ties in the role of colonist and Jamestown. It also discusses how wars increased the need for lumber. This site would be good for a student web quest activity at a 5th grade level or higher. Students would have to read the article and sift through the details to get the information. The site also has a video on current day logging.

Share It With Others!

This site denotes fact versus myth about all those Thanksgiving stories we grew up with as children. Were Europeans met at Plymouth Rock by friendly, helpful Indians? 

Share It With Others!

Gives an overview of information contained at the museum including historical information about encounters between Native Americans and European Explorers. Also includes links to lesson plans and information on finding professional development opportunities and field trip opportunities at the musuem.

Share It With Others!

Exploration Fur Trade and Hudson’s Bay Company website has a number of activities geared towards 5th grade and middle school students. Teachers can access Building a Trading Post: How to Choose a Site lesson plan and a crossword puzzle highlighting the role of the HBC in the fur trade industry with Native Americans.

Share It With Others!

for some Native Americans this combination provided them with the necessary goods to climb the ladder of wealth. Native Americans were experienced in hunting and the white traders had the steel tools, and as they say the rest is history. The website contains lessons on Basic Units of Trade: Money Blankets & Coppers, Free Presentations in PowerPoint format, and Free Clip Art

Share It With Others!

Europeans came to North American in search of precious metals – finding none, they embarked upon the next best thing – furs. The site provides links to articles on early trades, legal and illegal trades, and battles for trades.

Share It With Others!

The site offers Native-African American music and other literature for purchase. The website has examples of music playing in the background and has links to history, native healers, clothing, and jewelry. The music can be used as an auditory example of the culture.

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT