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Links 1 through 10 of 186 by Angela Alcorn tagged lifehacks

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80. Know less, think more. In our parents' generation, it was difficult and expensive to be knowledgable. Since then, the ubiquity of the Internet has made knowledge almost trivial to obtain, yet we still teach kids by rote and revere those who can recall details of the French Revolution at dinner parties. The market correction will come, at which point those who've spent significant time internalizing wikipedia will realize that they truly are redundant. Instead of seeking knowledge, you should first convince yourself that you're good enough at finding knowledge when required, then direct the remainder of your attention to improving your thinking.

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Excerpt: "You wait until the last minute to buy Christmas presents. You put off seeing the dentist, or getting that thing checked out by the doctor, or filing your taxes. You forget to register to vote. You need to get an oil change. There is a pile of dishes getting higher in the kitchen. Shouldn’t you wash clothes now so you don’t have to waste a Sunday cleaning every thing you own?"

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Extract of conclusion: "But before we rush to overcome procrastination we should consider whether it is sometimes an impulse we should heed. The philosopher Mark Kingwell puts it in existential terms: “Procrastination most often arises from a sense that there is too much to do, and hence no single aspect of the to-do worth doing. . . . Underneath this rather antic form of action-as-inaction is the much more unsettling question whether anything is worth doing at all.” In that sense, it might be useful to think about two kinds of procrastination: the kind that is genuinely akratic and the kind that’s telling you that what you’re supposed to be doing has, deep down, no real point. The procrastinator’s challenge, and perhaps the philosopher’s, too, is to figure out which is which."

Hah - I love how one of the recommended tags for this article is "toread". Awesome work guys. :)

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