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Links 1 through 7 of 7 by Shaun Green tagged popculture

Her celebrity status meant every painful twist in her chaotic lifestyle was played out in lurid detail in the press— blood soaked ballet pumps, arms razed with scratches, slumped in a corner at parties. Hardly glorification.

I’d been to several festivals where she’d played—or tried to. Incoherent and stumbling, close-ups on large screens beamed out a small pale girl whose wrinkled skin belied her age.

People turned, tutted, walked away. Some jeered and booed. Others stood and watched wide-eyed in horror. (Some wide-eyed from ingesting a similar cocktail of class As and booze—their drug consumption not having turned bad.) You have to question the wisdom of thrusting such a vulnerable person onto a stage—trial by rather hypocritical festival going crowd. Sympathy, one the whole, was notable by its absence.

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I am a great fan of the pleasures of surprise. When I discuss or review new films and books, I'm cautious not to disclose key plot twists. But as I find myself in the thick of finale season and drowning in a sea of springtime blockbusters, it seems I can't have a decent water cooler conversation without feeling like I'm tap dancing through a minefield of, "Wait, wait, don't tell me!" So let's get a few things straight: Starting with the fact that once a work enters the pop culture vernacular, it is not society's responsibility to provide you with earmuffs until you finally get around to experiencing it.

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Oldz like to think that Kids These Days are completely different from the way oldz were back in the day. When oldz are exposed to new developments in youth culture, they usually get angry and confused, and say things like "[CURRENT BAND] fucking sucks, what's wrong with kids these days? Ugh. They should listen to [OLD BAND THAT NOBODY UNDER 30 CARES ABOUT], that's what's up." But the truth is that the more things change, the more they stay the same: the stuff kids like today is the same stuff we liked, just with slightly different clothes and haircuts (and flagrant autotune abuse). In fact, there are basically only 5 kinds of music that teens like, and they are THE SAME ONES that us oldz liked when we were teens. I will provide examples, then map the current version of each kind against the version for oldz to illustrate my point.

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"Quite quickly, I made the discovery that musicians weren't, for the most part, very godlike or even particularly interesting. In fact, they seemed rather dim."

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A short and entertaining interview with Alan Moore. When I am old, I too will grow that beard.

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"Kerouac and the Beats have touched virtually all modern culture." A short guide to the historical and cultural significance of the Beat movement.

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