Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 5111 Shaun Green's Bookmarks

Chilcot made clear from the start that potential witnesses would be given the opportunity to comment on criticisms. It would be wrong to go back on that promise. The question is whether it should have been made in the first place – and whether or not it should be made in future inquiries. Chilcot has called Maxwellisation ‘normal practice’; Andrew Bailey and Brian Pomeroy, who are leading an inquiry into the near demise of HBOS, have said that it is ‘legally required’. Our law is such that custom slides silently into obligation. But in fact Maxwellisation is a recent innovation, barely customary, and almost certainly not obligatory.

Share It With Others!

The key to social injustice in Angola is a repressive government, ostentatiously decked out in fossil fuel receipts. Western oil companies remained in the country throughout the years of conflict, and beyond. But a dispute 15 years ago with Western lenders over where the government’s oil receipts were going left the door open to the Chinese, and in 2004 trade figures with China began to show a decisive upturn. Today China is Angola’s major trading partner, rolling out a national infrastructure (including railways and quick-build housing) in return for fuel. The ‘Angola model’, Soares de Oliveira explains, is simply a ‘resources for infrastructure deal … oil cargoes in exchange for Chinese credit lines to help finance reconstruction’. It looks enviable, not just to Western investors who feel the IMF’s fastidiousness gave China an unfair advantage, but to African countries without the same resources.

Share It With Others!

“Trees are hard to make in videogames in general. There’s a reason you have whole companies like SpeedTree whose entire business is making trees for videogames. So for us we were using Unity before that middleware was available so we didn’t really have a choice but to make our own stuff. Firewatch is a forest which means half of what you see all the time are trees. That took a good amount of time to figure out!”

Share It With Others!

A summary-ish of things related to code signing, the developer portal, and provisioning profiles.

I believe this is mostly accurate - but I admit that I have not dug deep into the internals because this rough understanding has served me well enough so far. Don’t take this as some kind of technical gospel to swear by. Instead this is meant more to help anyone who might be really confused to start to find meaning in what can seem like chaos and pointless complexity. Putting this together helped me clarify the reasons for the different parts and roughly how they fit together and why they’re necessary. If you want to know precise technical details about this stuff, I’m not your guy - I just want to build apps and not spend all my time fighting the technology. I hope this helps someone find peace without adding too much confusion.

Share It With Others!

Money remains at the centre of everything, though there may be more ways to manipulate it than there were in Moses’s day. Developers still collaborate with government officials to generate private wealth, only now they do it through twenty-year tax abatements or the ‘private activity bonds’ issued to insiders in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. Despite the efforts of the current mayor, Bill de Blasio, to make housing more affordable, the city remains as committed as ever to high-end real-estate developers at the expense of everyone else. Moses would greet that news with his trademark grin.

Share It With Others!

I've heard this advice over and over and over at startup events, to the point that I got a little sick of hearing it. It's not wrong. Putting aside the fact that every single other startup in the world who heard this same advice before you is already out there frantically doing everything they can to hire all the best people out from under you and everyone else, it is superficially true. A company staffed by a bunch of people who don't care about their work and aren't good at their jobs isn't exactly poised for success. But in a room full of people giving advice to startups, nobody wants to talk about the elephant in that room: It doesn't matter how good the people are at your company when you happen to be working on the wrong problem, at the wrong time, using the wrong approach. Most startups, statistically speaking, are going to fail.

Share It With Others!

I've talked about how games have become more accessible countless times due to a variety of reasons. For today's post, I want to talk about the greater role that abstracted mechanics and game design have had to make it easier to learn games, and why some genres are still having trouble broadening their audience.

Share It With Others!

Few 4X games have a point of view or attempt to tell a story beyond “claim territory, make progress, get stronger than your neighbors”. They’re not even very interested in what one victory path implies versus the others. These endgames are supposed to represent the culmination of meaningful choices, but are themselves almost entirely meaningless. That lack of purpose or vision is palpable in games like Beyond Earth, the 4X equivalent of a shrug, or in the dull fantasy worlds of a half-dozen 4X pretenders. Fundamentally, 4X games are stagnating because they are ultimately games about progress that nevertheless have nothing whatsoever to say on the subject. Their version of progress is almost universally boring.

Share It With Others!

Spoiler alert, RPGs are kinda ridiculous. Most games are, of course. While the Mythbusters may have shown that carrying Doomguy’s loadout into battle isn’t as bad as it might sound, there’s a reason they’ve never done a follow-up about doing it after taking a few rockets to the face. Likewise, we can’t know the effect of glugging down fifty health potions a day, but it must mean a lot of pauses for the heroic knight to hurriedly get his armour off for a quick pee-break. Like a lot of things, there’s a line here – on one side, things that are interesting to see a game justify, and on the other, things that are probably best handwaved. Where does that line lie?

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT