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Links 31 through 40 of 561 Luca Bigliardi's Bookmarks

Pop Quiz: What was the first personal computer?

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The speech accent archive uniformly presents a large set of speech samples from a variety of language backgrounds. Native and non-native speakers of English read the same paragraph and are carefully transcribed. The archive is used by people who wish to compare and analyze the accents of different English speakers.

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The Voices Recordings are the most significant popular survey of regional English ever undertaken around the UK: 300 recorded conversations involving a total of 1,201 people talking about accent and dialect, the words they use, and their attitudes to language. Of the conversations, 250 are in English, 31 are in Scots, 10 are in Welsh, six in Scots Gaelic, three in Irish, three in Ulster Scots, and one each in Manx and Guernsey French.

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General semantics is a non-Aristotelian educational discipline created by Alfred Korzybski (1879–1950) during the years 1919 to 1933. General Semantics is distinct from semantics (a sub-field of linguistics), a different subject. The name technically refers to the study of what Korzybski called "semantic reactions", or reactions of the whole human organism within the environment to some event — any event, not just perceiving a human-made symbol — with respect to the meaning of that event. However, people most commonly use the name to mean the particular system of semantic reactions that Korzybski called the most useful for human survival, that is to say delayed reactions as opposed to "signal reactions" (immediate, unthinking ones).

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This is a tale of two approaches to regular expression matching. One of them is in widespread use in the standard interpreters for many languages, including Perl. The other is used only in a few places, notably most implementations of awk and grep.

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Is your browser configuration rare or unique? If so, web sites may be able to track you, even if you limit or disable cookies. Panopticlick tests your browser to see how unique it is based on the information it will share with sites it visits. Click below and you will be given a uniqueness score, letting you see how easily identifiable you might be as you surf the web. Only anonymous data will be collected by this site.

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Every ten minutes the black box pings a server on the internet via the ethernet connection to check if it is for sale on the eBay. If its auction has ended or it has sold, it automatically creates a new auction of itself. If a person buys it on eBay, the current owner is required to send it to the new owner. The new owner must then plug it into ethernet, and the cycle repeats itself.

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Even if the first RFC that describes this protocol was released in 1995, IPv6 is pretty new and we just begin to see researches, books, papers that cover this protocol. Thus IPv6 was my project for this google Summer of Code. More precisely the project, proposed by FreeBSD, covers security of the IPv6 protocol, the initial job was to review the last years IPv6 stack vulnerabilities and saw if they were fixed in the KAME IPv6 stack used by FreeBSD but I extended the project by trying to find new vulnerabilities, new attacks and so on. This paper tries to give an overview of the work made.

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Welcome to Microbial Art, a collection of unique artworks created using living bacteria, fungi, and protists

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In this paper, we challenge the assumption that shellcode must conform to superficial and discernible representations. Specifically, we demonstrate a technique for automatically producing English Shellcode, transforming arbitrary shellcode into a representation that is superficially similar to English prose. The shellcode is completely self-contained (i.e., it does not require an external loader and executes as valid IA32 code) and can typically be generated in under an hour on commodity hardware.

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