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Links 1 through 10 of 29 by Luca Bigliardi tagged media:document

We consider the task of summarizing a cluster of related sentences with a short sentence which we call multi-sentence compression and present a simple approach based on shortest paths in word graphs. The advantage and the novelty of the proposed method is that it is syntax-lean and requires little more than a tokenizer and a tagger. Despite its simplicity, it is capable of generating grammatical and informative summaries as our experiments with English and Spanish data demonstrate.

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In this paper we experimentally evaluate these issues on a modern automobile and demonstrate the fragility of the underlying system structure. We demonstrate that an attacker who is able to infiltrate any Electronic Control Unit (ECU) can leverage this ability to completely circumvent a broad array of safety-critical systems. Over a range of experiments, we demonstrate the ability to adversarially control a wide range of automotive functions and completely ignore driver input, including disabling the brakes, selectively braking individual wheels on demand, stopping the engine, and so on. We find that it is possible to bypass rudimentary network security protections within the car, such as maliciously bridging between our car’s two internal subnets. We also present composite attacks that leverage individual weaknesses, including an attack that embeds malicious code in a car’s telematics unit and that will completely erase any evidence of its presence after a crash.

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The self-assembly of molecularly precise nanostructures is widely expected to form the basis of future high-speed integrated circuits, but the technologies suitable for such circuits are not well understood. In this work, DNA self-assembly is used to create molecular logic circuits that can selectively identify specific biomolecules in solution by encoding the optical response of near-field coupled arrangements of chromophores. The resulting circuits can detect label-free, femtomole quantities of multiple proteins, DNA oligomers,
and small fragments of RNA in solution via ensemble optical measurements. This method, which is capable of creating multiple logic-gate–sensor pairs on a 2 x 80 x 80-nm DNA grid, is a step toward more sophisticated nanoscale logic circuits capable of interfacing computers with biological processes.

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This paper presents a set of exploits an adversary can use to continuously spy on most BitTorrent users of the Internet from a single machine and for a long period of time. Using these exploits for a period of 103 days, we collected 148 million IPs downloading 2 billion copies of contents. We identify the IP address of the content providers for 70% of the BitTorrent contents we spied on. We show that a few content providers inject most contents into BitTorrent and that those content providers are located in foreign data centers. We also show that an adversary can compromise the privacy of any peer in BitTorrent and identify the big downloaders that we define as the peers who subscribe to a large number of contents. This infringement on users' privacy poses a significant impediment to the legal adoption of BitTorrent.

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In social choice theory, Arrow’s impossibility theorem, the General Possibility Theorem, or Arrow’s paradox, demonstrates that no voting system can convert the ranked preferences of individuals into a community-wide ranking while also meeting a certain set of criteria with three or more discrete options to choose from. These criteria are called unrestricted domain, non-imposition, non-dictatorship, Pareto efficiency, and independence of irrelevant alternatives.

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Even if the first RFC that describes this protocol was released in 1995, IPv6 is pretty new and we just begin to see researches, books, papers that cover this protocol. Thus IPv6 was my project for this google Summer of Code. More precisely the project, proposed by FreeBSD, covers security of the IPv6 protocol, the initial job was to review the last years IPv6 stack vulnerabilities and saw if they were fixed in the KAME IPv6 stack used by FreeBSD but I extended the project by trying to find new vulnerabilities, new attacks and so on. This paper tries to give an overview of the work made.

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In this paper, we challenge the assumption that shellcode must conform to superficial and discernible representations. Specifically, we demonstrate a technique for automatically producing English Shellcode, transforming arbitrary shellcode into a representation that is superficially similar to English prose. The shellcode is completely self-contained (i.e., it does not require an external loader and executes as valid IA32 code) and can typically be generated in under an hour on commodity hardware.

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People often write less readable code because they think it will produce faster code. Unfortunately, in most cases, the code will not be faster.

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Some of us believe that anything presented in a pictorial format is easy to understand. Not so. The information contained in many graphs is completely obscured by the noise that accompanies it.

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With a suitable algorithm for ranking the expertise of a user in a collaborative tagging system, we will be able to identify experts and discover useful and relevant resources through them. We propose that the level of expertise of a user with respect to a particular topic is mainly determined by two factors. Firstly, an expert should possess a high quality collection of resources, while the quality of a Web resource depends on the expertise of the users who have assigned tags to it. Secondly, an expert should be one who tends to identify interesting or useful resources before other users do. We propose a graph-based algorithm, SPEAR (SPamming-resistant Expertise Analysis and Ranking), which implements these ideas for ranking users in a folksonomy. We also show that the algorithm is more resistant to spammers than other methods such as the original HITS algorithm and simple statistical measures.

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