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Links 1 through 10 of 409 Sarah Kendrew's Bookmarks

… but there’s one more in the clearly infinite line of plagiarizing German politicians – Florian Graf, Christian Democratic Union parliamentary leader, seems to have plagiarized his doctorate.

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As many of you know, the NSF Astronomy Division recently created an opportunity for funding entitled “Planning a Partnership Model for a Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope” that offered the possibility of one award of $250,000 per year for 5 years to “refine the roles of NSF and the community in project development, engage in planning science and engineering operations, prepare for potential future Federal funding opportunities after the start of the next decade.” The GMT Board has decided to carry forward our efforts to engage the U.S. astronomical community in other ways: we will not be submitting a response to this solicitation." > interesting!

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Last week I was put in touch with a reporter from my local newspaper, the Cambridge News, who was writing a story about the University’s Annual Report....

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By big, I don't just mean important. Both studies made use of a much larger set of data than is usual in neuroimaging studies. Thyreau et al scanned 1,326 people. For comparison, a lot of fMRI studies have more like n=13. Gonzalez-Castillo et al, on the other hand, only had 3 people - but each one was scanned while performing the same task 500 times over.

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Liège is grim, but Seraing, a half-hour bus ride away, is even grimmer. It's a wasteland of broken windows, abandoned factories and unchecked graffiti. It's in Seraing that you can find the tomb of British-born John Cockerill, who in the early 19th century revolutionised the steel industry and helped to turn the region into the first fully industrialised area in continental Europe."When we were at school, it was still busy," says Jean-Pierre Dardenne. "There were shops, lots of people … Now in places there's 25% unemployment."

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At the turn of the century, Liz Smith in The Royle Family offered that immortal line about Anthony's new vegetarian girlfriend: "Could she just have some wafer-thin ham?". Still wonderful, and still true, to judge by the reaction to the "news" about the links between red meat and cancer. Which remains indigestible. Everything gives you cancer. More mustard on my hotdog, please.

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There are many reasons why errors creep into science journalism, beyond what the journalist happens to write. Scientists can publish fraudulent papers, draw false conclusions from their experiments, or give misleading quotes. Press officers can paint results in a skewed light, omit or strip out context, and make up quotes entirely. Editors can assign reporters to tenuous stories. Sub-editors can introduce errors.

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Skilled migrants to lose right to settle in UK

Theresa May plans to force skilled migrant workers to leave the UK after five years if they earn less than £35,000 a year

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A website has been launched that aims to get the public involved in the search for extraterrestrial life.

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