Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share This URL With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

Links 1 through 10 of 695 Rochelle Jensen's Bookmarks

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Use PicLits, a free drag-and-drop literacy tool, to encourage your English learners to create sentences inspired by pictures. Or they can add inspirational or humorous captions to pictures. Learn It provides learning opportunities and examples for creating captions, compound sentences or paragraphs. Advanced lesson plans for teachers appear under the Learn It tab as well. Under View the Gallery, students can see already created PicLits as well as comments and ratings. After selecting a picture (or using the one provided) and dragging a word onto the screen, they can choose different forms of the word by using the drop-down menu next to the word. They can move their words anywhere on the screen for creative writing. Or they can click “freestyle” to type in their own words instead of choosing from their list. The wordlists change, depending on the image students select.

Share It With Others!

Ask Me Anything
Make sentence writing fun for your English learners with the help of the writing Robot Tutor! In this online interactive, students write a question for the Robot Tutor—for example, What is your name? What is your favorite book? Where do you live? The Robot Tutor then answers each question. The interactive provides practice in writing simple interrogative sentences and reading simple declarative responses.

Share It With Others!

What’s Wrong?
Challenge your English learners to decide if the sentences on this site are run-ons. Each run-on sentence is accompanied by an explanation of the corrections needed. Students then select the remedy that would best repair that sentence. (The remedy will show only enough of the sentence to indicate what was wrong and how to fix it.) If the sentence is correctly written the way it stands, students select the first option. The explanation will attempt to justify the suggested editing of that sentence. If students choose the correct response, they can still consult the explanation to see if their explanations are the same as the suggested explanation.

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Help your ESL students practice making simple sentences with the three games on BBC’s Skillswise site. In one game, students decide whether a group of words is a sentence. In another game, students construct sentences that make sense. And in a third game, students combine sentences into an authentic writing form—for example, a formal letter, an email, a children’s story, a news story—using correct capitalization and punctuation. Students may listen to the text being read aloud, but note that the speaker has a British accent.

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!