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Links 1 through 10 of 9698 Paul Dudman's Bookmarks

Thousands of asylum seekers are living in destitution for years in the UK due to failures in local and central governments to address the problem in the support system, a report has found.

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When I meet him in the village in which he grew up, Norman Okello leads me to a quiet space beneath two mango trees, far enough away that his mother and father and children won’t hear the stories he’ll tell. We’re in the north of Uganda and the scene around us is of a kind of pastoral paradise: huts of earth and thatch; the green shoots of sweet potatoes in the dark earth; hills in the distance. It’s hard to imagine this place as it was on January 1 1994, with a Ugandan army helicopter flying low, AK47s firing, and the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), somewhere out there, whispering among the tall grasses.

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Shannon Jensen traveled to South Sudan almost two years ago intent on drawing global attention to the country’s refugee crisis, where more than 100,000 people had walked hundreds of miles to escape Sudan’s brutal war. By that time, there had been a few dramatic photo essays published in major magazines and newspapers, including The New York Times, showing the deplorable conditions faced by refugees in South Sudan’s Nuba Mountains region. Instead, Ms. Jensen went to the Blue Nile region, where the refugee crisis had barely been covered. She found 70,000 refugees there when she arrived and 30,000 descending upon the area the first week she was there. She spoke with her subjects as she photographed at the border and in a temporary roadside settlement near a livestock watering hole.

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With permission, Mr Speaker, I wish to make a statement on the Cabinet Secretary’s report on the Indian Operation at Sri Harmandir Sahib, also called the Golden Temple, in Amritsar in June 1984. The House will recall that on 13th January concerns were raised regarding two documents released to the public in the National Archives. The documents relate to the painful events that followed the occupation of the Temple site by Sikh dissidents in December 1983, which led to a six-month standoff with the Indian authorities.

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Some of the buttons now stick on the old controller Jan Derksen used to use as he whiled away childhood hours playing Super Mario. The flap squeaks. Derksen has recorded its sounds and uploaded them. He collects such noises in his archive of vanishing noises, Conserve the Sound. Other entries of once-everyday sounds include chalk on a blackboard or the clicking of a rotary dial phone. He's trying to make sure these don't disappear forever.

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The East London Mosque Trust (ELMT) was honoured to host a visit from Clem Brohier, Interim Chief Executive of The National Archives on 16 January 2014. The meeting took place with the Mosque’s Archive Steering Committee represented by Dr Jamil Sherif, who was instrumental in establishing the archives at the Mosque, and Rosemary Seton of the Religious Archives Group. Shaynul Khan, Assistant Executive Director of the ELMT was present to talk about the Mosque’s 104 year history and give a brief tour. Dr Tim Powell, Senior Adviser: Religious Archives at The National Archives , was also present, having also visited the archives last year and provided advice on the project

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Mr Speaker, with permission I would like to make a statement regarding the Government’s proposal to relocate some of the most vulnerable refugees who have fled the conflict in Syria. I’m sure the whole House will join me in deploring the appalling scenes of violence and suffering which we have witnessed in Syria. More than 100,000 people have been killed and the credible reports of systematic use of torture and starvation are simply sickening. Millions of innocent people have fled their homes. There are now more than 11 million Syrians in desperate need, including 6 and a half million people displaced inside Syria and more than 2.3 million refugees in neighbouring countries – at least half of them children.

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Since the World Conference on Women in Mexico in 1975 – which was a milestone in the battle for equality – Bangladesh has been at the forefront among the least-developed countries (LDCs) in addressing gender disparities. Bangladesh has the eighth lowest gender gap in political empowerment in the world. This is partially due to the fact that it has had a female head of state for longer than any other country in the world. In addition, the proportion of seats held by women in the national parliament doubled from 10 per cent in 1990 to 20 per cent in 2011. Women’s growing presence in the political sphere has had important implications on the family structure. Society is moving away from the traditional view that women are an economic liability and that sons are more desirable than daughters. Studies show that the growing independence of women is one of the major causes of a decline in the “missing women” phenomenon – gender based infanticide – in Bangladesh.

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The Liberal Democrats are threatening to block Conservative amendments to toughen up the Government’s immigration policies. LibDem sources accused the Tories of “improper” tactics by using their backbenchers to table changes to the Immigration Bill when it is debated by MPs next week. It emerged on Friday that Tory back-benchers want to amend the Immigration Bill, which will be debated next week, to make an annual assessment about whether are too many migrants are coming to Britain

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Sham marriages are a "massive loophole" in Britain's border controls and amount to a "golden ticket" into the country for immigrants, an official report has warned. John Vine, the Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration, highlighted serious failings in the way officials are attempting to combat bogus marriages. He found evidence it could be a "growing problem", but intelligence on the true picture was "lagging behind".

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