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Links 1 through 10 of 944 Rakesh Patel's Bookmarks

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Although self-assessment is widely acknowledged as a vital skill for members of self-regulating professions, a ubiquitous finding in the research literature is that self-ratings are quite poor when compared with externally generated measures of ability. Many researchers have identified this as a serious problem for the concept of self-regulation in the professions. However, we question the sufficiency of the operational definitions of self-assessment on which the previous research is based. This study examines the validity of a new conceptualization of self-assessment in practice and evaluates a series of measures for capturing self-assessment ability as defined by this new conceptualization.

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Cognitive load theory aims to develop instructional design guidelines based on a model of human cognitive architecture. The architecture assumes a limited working memory and an unlimited long-term memory holding cognitive schemas; expertise exclu- sively comes from knowledge stored as schemas in long-term memory. Learning is described as the construction and automation of such sche- mas. Three types of cognitive load are distin- guished: intrinsic load is a direct function of the complexity of the performed task and the expertise of the learner; extraneous load is a result of superfluous processes that do not di- rectly contribute to learning, and germane load is caused by learning processes that deal with intrinsic cognitive load.

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