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Links 1 through 4 of 4 by Latoya Peterson tagged worldcup2010

"Recently, the London Review of Books contracted the South African writer and Rhodes scholar R W Johnson to write a series of blog posts on the World Cup. Johnson, an Anglophone liberal, was once the authoritative source for the centre-left press in the UK on apartheid. He has long since moved to the right, disappointed by post-apartheid South Africa and almost comically paranoid about Marxist racist black nationalist conspirators having taken control of the ANC and driven the country into the dirt....If he was ever a reliable source, it is fair to say that he has long since ceased to be...Unfortunately, Johnson has embarrassed his employers with a rather peculiar racist outburst in an article entitled 'After the World Cup' (or rather that appears to have been the title finally chosen - the URL of the now vanished post suggests that it was originally called 'The Coming of the Baboons')."

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"CBC's coverage seems to give tacit approval to an idea of the big physical undisciplined African. Despite African teams averaging less than a goal against them in each one in their opening games, nearly all were challenged as having possible issues with a lack of defensive discipline. Going into the Nigeria vs. Argentina match, CBC's Nigel Reed claimed that Nigerians would be physical and challenge the Argentines. In actuality the Nigerians committed only one more foul than the South American team."

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"In the popular imagination, African music is the antithesis of urban. It's folk music, music of the bush, music of mythical village cultures that are still intact. Kwaito, born in townships and featuring occasionally misogynistic lyrics and a whiff of gangsterism, doesn't fit that image. Of course, the image is absolute nonsense: one of the first African sounds to make global inroads was jit, the sound of urban Zimbabwe in the 1980s. But you can see, even in its packaging, how this need to imagine Africa as exclusively rural persists: recently a reviewer rightly castigated the African Pearls compilation for an album cover that featured barefoot women dancing around a baobab tree — for a compilation of urban 1970s music from Senegal. It's quite a cheap trick."

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Britain is to give 42m condoms to South Africa in response to a request for an extra billion as part of an HIV prevention drive before the World Cup, the government will announce today.

The request for British help in stockpiling sufficient condoms for the expected influx of thousands of football supporters in three months' time was made during President Jacob Zuma's recent visit to the UK to meet the Queen.

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