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Links 1 through 10 of 11 by Latoya Peterson tagged southcarolina

"Shery Lanford Smith, the chairwoman of Sumter Tea Party in South Carolina is under fire after posting a joke about killing President and First Lady Obama on her Facebook profile last Thursday. In the joke, the Obamas’ helicopter pilot says to his co-pilot, 'I could throw both of them out of the window and make 256 million people very happy!' Smith continued, 'If you’re one of [the] 256 million, pass it on,' which implies “she herself would be happy to see the Obamas killed.” 

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I'm not feeling this piece because it seems to be that old parlor game, Police the Race/Ethnicity. But this may be my own interpretation. Thoughts?--AJP "[N]ow they’ve found the perfect 'white lie.' They can use to it drive home the point that she is brown, that despite those blue power suits and that nice all-American National Guard husband, she is different, not one of them. They can now do it without being accused of playing race politics. They are hoping this might mark the beginning of the end for this particular shooting star story. Haley’s comet — the new face of the American South — now revealed to be an optical illusion. Now she’s brown, now she’s not."

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"Most Southern states followed a one-quarter or one-eighth rule: anyone with a black grandparent or great-grandparent was legally black, and those with more remote ancestry were legally white. Antebellum South Carolina, though, never had a legal definition of race. 'It may be well and proper,' a state judge and leading defender of slavery wrote in 1835, 'that a man of worth, honesty, industry and respectability, should have the rank of a white man, while a vagabond of the same degree of blood should be confined to the inferior caste.' Preserving the institution of slavery mattered far more than preserving the purity of white 'blood.' As long as people who claimed to be white were productive members of society — in effect, supporting the prevailing order — it made little sense to mandate a stricter measure of race."

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"The South Carolina Senate late Wednesday passed legislation that will require voters to show photo identification in order to cast a ballot. South Carolina Department of Motor Vehicle statistics show that nearly 180,000 voters in South Carolina – most of whom are elderly, student, minority or low-income voters – will be disenfranchised as a result of this discriminatory bill. Proponents of the bill claim the voter ID requirement will curb in-person election fraud. The South Carolina Election Commission, however, reports that no cases of fraud exist."

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"But the former secretary of state and Joint Chiefs chairman told the 400 graduates of South Carolina State University that he particularly enjoyed another event of the past week: 'That was when President Obama took out his birth certificate and blew away Donald Trump and all the birthers!'"

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"'Technically, the Gullah people never used that term (Gullah) until about the 1980s, when academicians started using the term,' says Veronica Gerald, a professor of English at Coastal Carolina University who has spent 30 years studying the culture. 'Early on, the term and the culture did not find prestige in either African-American or white culture, partly because of misunderstanding. Many thought that their dialect, as it was called at that time, was an inability to speak ‘proper English.’ So for most Gullah people, one of their primary efforts was to remove evidence of the dialect from their speech patterns.'”

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"Dot Scott, president of the local chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said even such programs may not be enough to get blacks involved in 150th-anniversary events.

"'It's almost like celebrating with the enemy,' she said. 'I personally began to have a feeling of why would I want to be a part of it?'"

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In molecularshyness' own words: "Oh hell. Am I gonna have to go though 4 years of this crap in SC?"--AJP

"Those who oppose the weeklong events disagree with what they see as romanticizing the antebellum South. The Rev. Nelson Rivers III, of the NAACP, says people who believe the war was fought over states' rights are not confronting the real cause: slavery.

"'No matter how you dress it up, how you try to revise history,' Rivers says, 'when you're finished with this story, the war was about the South, and my state in particular, South Carolina, wanting to be able to hold black people as property. That's wrong.'"

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"Attendees at Monday’s ball would like to believe that the unanimity of slaveowners and non-slaveowners during the crisis proves that slavery wasn’t the driving issue behind secession. But a closer study of the contentious debate over secession in late 1860 shows how “fire-eaters” used fear of emancipation to coerce and persuade whites of all classes into ultimately supporting secession. (Needless to say, the state’s black majority likely didn’t support secession either—though no one bothered to ask them.)"

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"So far, Haley has used her race and gender as a way to position herself as a Republican party outsider—a good place to be in a year when the party insiders have been nothing but a disgrace. A story she likes to tell, of being disqualified from a beauty pageant as a child because she could be neither the black queen or white queen, emphasizes that’s she’s neither (and, of course, draws attention her looks, without which it seems hard for Republican women politicians to gain prominence). Subtly implied by this story is the suggestion that both blacks and whites received her with the same degree of animosity—that perhaps black South Carolinians are just as racist as whites are, a common refrain in the Tea Party victim storyline, though one not borne out by Haley's own background."

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