Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 24 by Latoya Peterson tagged privilege

"Anyone can have [But I'm A Vegan problem]—white people, black people, women, men, Jews, Muslims, Christians, anyone. And though it sounds a lot like privilege, it's different. Privilege is a toxic yet unintentional default setting, whereas BIAV is willful ignorance. Privilege is what causes Moby, as a wealthy white guy, to think it's funny for black rappers to name-check museums; BIAV is what prompts him to snark at anyone who would dare suggest he is in the wrong. Privilege is forgivable; BIAV is inexcusable."

Share It With Others!

Say that, Sherman Alexie!--AJP "When some cultural critics fret about the 'ever-more-appalling' YA books, they aren’t trying to protect African-American teens forced to walk through metal detectors on their way into school. Or Mexican-American teens enduring the culturally schizophrenic life of being American citizens and the children of illegal immigrants. Or Native American teens growing up on Third World reservations. Or poor white kids trying to survive the meth-hazed trailer parks. They aren’t trying to protect the poor from poverty. Or victims from rapists.

"No, they are simply trying to protect their privileged notions of what literature is and should be. They are trying to protect privileged children. Or the seemingly privileged."

Share It With Others!

"[T]he rise in optimism is not linked to perceived end of discrimination.

"'No one black who I talked to thinks we have arrived at a point where we are an equal opportunity nation,' Cose says.

"Cose conducted two large surveys — one of black Harvard M.B.A.'s and one of graduates of A Better Chance, a program that sends kids to prep schools. He says he learned that for well-educated and well-prepared African-Americans, 'the sky is the limit.'

"Cose found that a generation after The Rage Of A Privileged Class, middle-class African-Americans are finding themselves with opportunities that didn't exist before."

Share It With Others!

"There are some legitimate criticisms of Affirmative Action. I think this is one of the dumbest. The underlying premise is that society is generally fair, and no one receives a leg up ever, except black people. Or it assumes that such advantages exist, but negritude, in the nation of white leagues, black codes, and red lines, imparts the sort of boost heretofore unwitnessed.
"But the history of America, itself, is, in no small measure, the history of an Affirmative Action program for white people."

Share It With Others!

"I think what bothers me about this is that neither side can see the sun through the trees. Look, the word f@ggot cannot be justified. Getting into a game of semantics leaves everyone a loser. It is equally wrong for anyone White, inject a racial slur into the conversation. No White person will ever know what it feels like to be called a nigger, and all analogy accomplished was to level the playing field and remind the Black person of the racial hierarchy. Why is it that marginalized groups cannot seem to understand that using oppression to fight oppression simply leads to - you guessed it - more oppression. Everyone loses when we take this approach. The bottom line is that White people don't get to invoke the word nigger as a teaching lesson, and no straight person gets to say the word f@ggot and get away with it. It all seems pretty simple to me, the moment one stops focusing on semantics."

Share It With Others!

"And perhaps inversely, the ancestry of the part-Latino pundits who were and are considered ‘White Dudes’ was not a factor in their ascending to such great heights because most people were unaware of their diverse family backgrounds. Perception trumps facts; if you are perceived as white, that can be beneficial. In the race game, the opposite of discrimination is often privilege, a concept that anti-racism activist Peggy McIntosh once defined in an essay:

As a white person, I realized I had been taught about racism as something which puts others at a disadvantage, but had been taught not to see one of its corollary aspects, white privilege, which puts me at an advantage…"

Share It With Others!

"When one lives in a settler-colonialist state, when one is ashamed of or conflicted about one's settler privilege or the actions of one's ancestors, it can appear to be emotionally simpler, easier, to identify with an indigenous viewpoint. "If I had lived then," so many of these books and movies say, "I would have done differently. I would have been on the side of the Natives." [4]

Almost always: would have done. Would have been.

Almost never: am doing.

Do you know what I long for? Truly, truly long for, from these white children's book authors who are guilty and unsettled about their settler's privilege? Books that engage with that. Books that discuss how to be white and in possession of settler-colonial privilege, how to look that in the face without going into a destructive tailspin of amnesia, guilt, futiliy, and appropriation."

Share It With Others!

"I want to find someone I can better relate to...

* someone more like me who grew up in a typical suburban neighborhood and took the bus to school and grew up on McDonald's and pre-cooked rotisserie chicken from Safeway.
* someone who cannot afford a trainer, a chef, days at the spa, or fresh organic foods 24/7.
* someone that works a regular day job and is pressed for time, energy, and resources.
* someone who is of color, an immigrant or a mix who has had to contend with cultural (non-American) issues like, "How not having the Asian skinny genes affected my body image" growing up in the U.S."

Share It With Others!

"Yesterday marked the second day of coordinated civil disobedience at the University of Puerto Rico in Rio Piedras as part of a strike that protests an $800 fee that some say is aimed at making the constitutional protected right to education in Puerto Rico a privilege. "This is a struggle that has been going on for months with very little coverage in the U.S. media even though Puerto Rico is a colony of the U.S. I ask again, were this happening at a university in Indiana, would it be so ignored?"

Share It With Others!

"When we asked the class to debrief after a few minutes of writing, I was taken aback by the responses. 'My initial reaction was absolute fear' one young woman stated. "I realized I know absolutely nothing about Native American culture, I didn't even know where to start." 'I found myself confused and hung up on the details--what is that thing in her hand? [it's her dance fan] why are they there? what goes on at a powwow?' a male classmate asked. Others agreed, chiming in with their own similar reactions. The comments were not rude, they were not even unexpected, but what struck me was how acceptable this level of ignorance was. No one was embarrassed or ashamed by their lack of knowledge, no one found it out of the ordinary. They shared without any hesitation, without apology."

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT