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Links 1 through 6 of 6 by Latoya Peterson tagged indonesia

"Like many social businesses, KeBal exists to bring goods or services to people who otherwise can’t afford them. An influential book by the business professor C.K. Prahalad argues that there’s a fortune to be made at the bottom of the pyramid. And, in fact, some large companies, like Unilever, have had success selling things like single-use sachets of shampoo or detergent to very poor people who only have tiny amounts of disposable income at any point in time. But what KeBal is trying to do is harder: not just size-down its products to fit the poor, but build a market from scratch for a new food product that costs more to produce because it is healthier. KeBal has the double challenge of serving people who can’t pay very much while having to change their eating habits. If this were easy to do profitably, social businesses wouldn’t be necessary."

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"For two years, Maxima has made some of Indonesia’s most popular domestic films based on a simple premise: that many in Muslim-majority Indonesia will pay to see foreign porn stars perform — clothed — in local films. Just don’t expect Indonesians to own up to it.

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"'Our whole immigration system, 80% of the cases are based on family unification, it's about keeping the family together,' Soloway said. 'But this just doesn't register with the LGBT community. It's a reflection of anti-gay discrimination.""

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"Haiibalah is one of many transgender Indonesians who are religious and adopt the jilbab, but how the transgender community see themselves is diverse. Some, like Haiibalah, identify as women—within them lies a woman’s soul (jiwa) in a man’s body. Others, on the other hand, view themselves as both male and female, and there are waria who identify as the third sex. Unlike Haiibalah, some trans women who wear the jilbab attend prayers in male attire but revert to women’s clothing and feminine demeanor the rest of the time."

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"Indonesia’s linguistic legacy is increasingly under threat as growing numbers of wealthy and upper-middle-class families shun public schools where Indonesian remains the main language but English is often taught poorly. They are turning, instead, to private schools that focus on English and devote little time, if any, to Indonesian.

"For some Indonesians, as mastery of English has become increasingly tied to social standing, Indonesian has been relegated to second-class status. In extreme cases, people take pride in speaking Indonesian poorly."

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"Many of the 5 million ethnic Chinese here, who represent a scant 2% of the population in this predominantly Muslim nation of 248 million, have for years awaited the results of a government investigation of the attacks. Twelve years later, no arrests have been made."

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