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Links 1 through 3 of 3 by Latoya Peterson tagged honduras

"They are the more than one million migrants who, fleeing from poverty, took to the road with no heed for the danger, even of losing their lives. Labeled as illegal, they defied the imperialist authorities and, after much sacrifice, arrived in the United States. Their remittances, beyond being a help for their families, are basic to the national economy.
According to the analyst, Honduras’ macroeconomic balance came about beginning in 1994 as a result of the remittances from migrants and reached a peak in 1998, with the passing of hurricane Mitch.

"Until 1998, Honduras was receiving 600 million lempiras [about 31 million US dollars] in remittances, but that natural event not only brought about the disaster of the moment but even revealed what had been happening all along. 'And it seems that that touched the migrants and they took on the habits of the Salvadorans, who had been the greatest source of remittances for their country, and then they began to send remittances,' he said."

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"Women delegates will meet to share their experiences in the resistance and the situation in their communities and within their own organizations, said Cárceres. This will enable them to better articulate strategies 'to support the struggle not only against capitalism but also against racism and patriarchy...' And making these connections requires going beyond reports of ongoing violations of indigenous and women’s human rights today to examine the patriarchal roots of colonialism and neoliberalism that have provided historical precedents and current strategies for the ongoing repression of indigenous and Afro peoples. 'This is part of the history of the resistence that we as indigenous and Afro-Honduran women continue to develop,' noted Cárceres."

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*TRIGGER WARNING*
"In the last four weeks the bodies of five transgender women in Honduras have been found. The murder of women, especially transgender women, has been on the rise following the June 28, 2009 coup. According to the International Gay & Lesbian Human Rights Commission, prior to the most recent murders, there have been 31 deaths of LGBTI people in Honduras in the last year and a half."

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