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Links 1 through 10 of 19 by Latoya Peterson tagged colonialism

"In the American psychology, when we went from 'We’re the champions of liberty. We’re going to go down to Cuba and free the poor little brown Cuban peasants from the these nasty Spanish imperialists, lessers and then within a couple months, somehow it was OK for us to go to the Philippines and kill Filipinos to take over their country. People were proudly saying, 'I’m an imperialist and it’s about time we became players like the British and the French and the Russians and the Germans and the Japanese.' It was pretty naked. It was racist and it was about 'We should be cashing in. There’s money to be made in the world and we should be in on it too.'”

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"Diplomatic crises between nations may come and go. Yet no president has done more to generate as many crises as Nicolas Sarkozy has to worsen relations between France and its former North African colonies. Indeed, Sarkozy has come to personify through his words and actions, the worrying and growing disdain which exists in France towards all things foreign or related to immigration. Here are some of Sarkozy’s actions which have alienated and even stigmatized North Africans in France and indeed angered his counterparts across the Mediterranean."

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"[Sue Gardner] likes to tell the story of the Ganges/Ganga argument playing out now on English Wikipedia. In India, the official name for the country's second-largest river is the Ganga. The British have long called it the Ganges, a term that bears the stench of colonization for many Indians. Since 2007, there has been a spirited back-and-forth between editors about whether a search for the river should redirect to Ganga or Ganges. "There are two Indian guys arguing one side, and then there's a bunch of casual editors from the United States and Europe arguing the other," says Gardner. "And it's interesting because there's this tiny number of Indians who care a lot and are correct and have all kinds of citations and evidence to support their view, and then there's this group who just are rebuffing them because the numbers are on their side. That's why everybody has to be [on Wikipedia], because if they're not there, the system doesn't work."

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"When one lives in a settler-colonialist state, when one is ashamed of or conflicted about one's settler privilege or the actions of one's ancestors, it can appear to be emotionally simpler, easier, to identify with an indigenous viewpoint. "If I had lived then," so many of these books and movies say, "I would have done differently. I would have been on the side of the Natives." [4]

Almost always: would have done. Would have been.

Almost never: am doing.

Do you know what I long for? Truly, truly long for, from these white children's book authors who are guilty and unsettled about their settler's privilege? Books that engage with that. Books that discuss how to be white and in possession of settler-colonial privilege, how to look that in the face without going into a destructive tailspin of amnesia, guilt, futiliy, and appropriation."

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"It's widely accepted that artists reinterpret reality, but the trouble is that Gauguin insisted that his depictions of island life were true — factual representations of a serene, sensual, primitive place. The French tourist industry was something of a co-conspirator in this; it wanted tourists to travel to the Polynesian colonies. And so it, too, underscored these images of lush, seductive destinations. These mass-marketed myths fed the fantasies of bored Europeans who were longing for something exotic, just out there somewhere, waiting to be discovered."

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"I feel a little queasy that we have to sell the drive for cultural autonomy and respect for foraging peoples with the whole ‘never seen a white man’ drivel. The term ‘uncontacted’ is part of the problem; ‘isolated’ would be better, as these groups have seldom ‘never seen a white man.’ They usually have developed a habit of reacting hostilely when they do, perhaps suggesting that it’s not so much lack of contact, but certain kinds of contact that they have experienced."

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"It’s a graphic where the left half is a black & white photo of several black, presumably African, children who look extremely malnourished; the right half is a color photo of a cow. The text at the bottom says, “Who do you want to feed?” The font, by the way, is the same one used for LOLcats or other popular graphics that are generally seen as sarcastic or ironic (like Privilege Denying Dude).

I get what the person is trying to say; it’s drawing attention to how much grain is used to feed cows that are killed for human consumption versus how many people that could feed instead. I get the intention. Nevertheless, intention itself is not enough. This graphic embodies the worst kind of oppression porn, OMG-THOSE-POOR-BROWN-PEOPLE-OVER-THERE."

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"Initially, I dismissed this as one of those things that academics worry about that the rest of the world really doesn't think about: Africans probably didn't make these films because they don't watch them. Considering that most African homes don't have televisions – I can't imagine that hearing a lion eating a wildebeest over the radio has quite the same effect as seeing it on television – surely the dearth of African presenters is a reflection of the lack of market for African fronted wildlife shows? However, if this is the case, what does that say about the people who do watch such shows? Will they only watch them when there's person of a certain demographic fronting them?"

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"Monica Y. sent a collection of vintage ads and cartoons illustrating how soap and cleanliness has been used as a metaphor for colonization.  The first two ads show how soap manufacturers and colonialists alike colluded in suggesting that the colonized were unclean/uncivilized and needed to be cleansed/enlightened."

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"However, Bienvenu Mbutu Mondondo, who has been campaigning for years to have the book removed from Belgian shops, says its depiction of native Africans – including a scene where a black woman bows before Tintin exclaiming "White man very great. White mister is big juju man!" – is ignorant and offensive, and he has applied to the Belgian courts to have it banned.

"It makes people think that blacks have not evolved," he said.

The verdict, originally expected today, has now been delayed until next week."

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