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Links 1 through 10 of 23 by Latoya Peterson tagged appropriation

"Why does the ugly resuscitation of the myth of the happy slave family matter? Because it is part of a broad and deliberate amnesia, like the misleading assertion by Sarah Palin that the founders were antislavery and the skipping of the “three-fifths” clause during a Republican reading of the Constitution on the House floor. The oft-repeated historical fictions about black families only prove how politically useful and resilient they continue to be in a so-called post-racial society. Refusing to be honest about how racial inequality has burdened our shared history and continues to shape our society will not get us to that post-racial vision."

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Giving this side-eye on the appropriation of the word "'hood,"--among other reasons--but that's me. Thoughts?--AJP "Pepsi-Cola North America Beverages (PCNAB) is in the 'hood, the South Bronx hood to be precise, teaming up with New Yorkers like Grammy Award producer, rapper, and artist Swizz Beatz, graffiti artist Cope 2, Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. and Assemblyman Carl Heastie, all gathered in support of healthier lifestyle choices. 'The Bronx community has a special style and swagger,' said Javier Farfan, PepsiCo Cultural Branding Senior Director. 'PCNAB wants to celebrate the community by letting residents know that they can make healthy lifestyle decisions without losing flavor, Bronx flavor.'"

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"The project has skeptics. Some see her as an artistic carpetbagger; before moving to Queens, she had never visited the borough, except for her own shows at MoMA PS1. Others say that her plans for social change sound naïve, and that her unusual living arrangement can be dismissed as a stunt.

“'Being able to hit the eject button at any time changes the experience in a dramatic way,' said Andrew Friedman, co-executive director of Make the Road New York, an immigrant advocacy group in Queens. 'I tend to be kind of allergic to the heroics of it.'”

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"Don’t tell me that this film is magically fine because there is Zhang Jizhong who got Gaiman on board in the first place or because there will be Chinese actors in the cast. That would be to overlook a cultural power dynamic of putting this inherently Asian work (and it is Asian: it is an East Asian story founded on a Chinese pilgrimage to India along a route that stretched through modern Iran and northern territories that were not Chinese then – it is a journey, a proper epic journey, not just through geography but also history) into the hands of Western media professionals whose bibliography or filmography demonstrate a clear disregard for the heritage of cultures not their own."

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"The Ray case highlights an outrage that's long existed for many Native Americans. They are tired of their traditions being co-opted by others and exploited for capital gain. They resent that a ceremony they view as sacred is now being tied to terms like 'death trap.' They don't want their ancient ways to be deemed fashionable or inspire impersonators."

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"Does the doll above look like she’s a native Hawaiian to you? Me neither. Yet, she’s American Girl’s doll of the year, Kanani. My spouse, Collateral Damage, has a few choice words on this today:

"'In Hawaiian Kanani means 'the beautiful one.' Apparently the beautiful one in Hawaii is Haole. While her last name, Akina, may sound Hawaiian it is actually Japanese (another group known primarily for black hair and eyes and a distinctly non-Caucasian skin tone). So American Girl™®© just decided to appropriate some ethnic sounding names, put a flower in the doll’s hair and call it Hawaiian. Aznuts, as the Hawaiians say. Hell, even Disney – which has a very long history of messing up on ethnic issues — was able to do this right.'"

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"Once a purely black concept, its new home is a multicultural America determined to celebrate diverse histories, experiences and cultures. Part of Kwanzaa's embrace by multicultural America is self-serving. Whereas black power uses Kwanzaa to connect black Americans with the continent of Africa, multicultural America uses Kwanzaa to sell products and consumer goods. Whereas black power expected Kwanzaa to liberate African-Americans, multicultural America has tried to use Kwanzaa as evidence of racial diversity and black inclusion.

We should applaud Kwanzaa's growth in American society, but we should also remain aware of a cautionary tale so often associated with holidays. Too much variation and too many usages will cause Kwanzaa to lose its original purpose. Just ask its neighbor, Christmas."

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"Holy Corn Nuts, we have someone to blame for that atrocious Sandra Lee Kwanzaa cake (which she makes in the video below, if you haven't seen it). "Seasoned food professional" Denise Vivaldo wrote a guilt-ridden, slightly crazy, possibly satirical account of her experience writing recipes under contract for Lee, one of which included the Kwanzaa Cake, the now-legendary store-bought angel food cake hack. Wrote Vivaldo, "As a matter of fact, the more tasteless the recipes got the more she liked them, the faster she approved them, and I could get home and drink some medium-priced wine after our meetings."

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"The Ngati Toa tribe, which hails from the southern tip of New Zealand’s North Island, is locked in talks with the New Zealand Rugby Union, the sport’s governing body. The tribe is trying to trademark phrases that form part of the song that the rugby players chant when performing the dance, known as the Haka. If the tribe is successful, the Haka as it is known today could disappear from the warm-up of New Zealand’s famous rugby team for the first time in more than a century."

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"The idea of brown women being over-sexed and improper, and thus more willing sexual participants for non-brown men, is an old and pervasive one. It's particularly clear looking at the costumes available for women. Pocahontas wears an up-to-there dress, Flamenco dancers bear a midriff, and a bush woman may get nothing more than a loin cloth. Perpetuating these ideas with hyper-sexual costumes is a common, yet potentially dangerous thing to do."

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