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Links 1 through 10 of 49 by Joe Spurr tagged press

Tuesday Justice Margot Botsford refused to halt the project’s expansion, writing in part, “There is no reason to single OpenCourt out and impose on it a variety of restrictions that do not apply to other media organizations.”

A point that seems to have been lost on Morrissey and CPCS.

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Judge Margot Botsford ruled yesterday in favor of the video streaming program, finding that OpenCourt is subject to the same rules that govern all other news media organizations covering the courts and therefore cannot be stopped from recording the jury trials.

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“There is a presumption that Massachusetts courts are open to media access and this ruling today clarified OpenCourt’s contention all along it should not be singled out as anything different from any other broadcast media,” said John Davidow, executive producer of OpenCourt and executive editor of new media at WBUR, the Boston public radio station where OpenCourt is a project.

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Since the launch of OpenCourt in May 2011, the project has made strides in journalism — planned ones and surprises, like the free Internet now available at the Quincy courthouse. One of the surprises: a lasting impact in Massachusetts’ legal landscape.

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In a First Amendment case with implications for both media outlets and crime victims, the state’s highest court has ruled that a radio station can post online a recording of a hearing involving a man charged with the kidnapping and forced prostitution of a 15-year-old girl in Quincy.

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Where court orders have restricted a radio station’s broadcasting of court proceedings over the Internet, those restrictions must be vacated on constitutional grounds.

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Just in time for Sunshine Week, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court has ruled in favor of courtroom transparency project OpenCourt and its ability to record and stream online video of public court proceedings.

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A ruling this week by the Supreme Judicial Court takes a giant step toward bringing this state into the 21st century in the way it defines “the press,” publishing and protecting the news media from anything that smacks of “prior restraint.”

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