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Links 1 through 10 of 14 Mark Tovey's Bookmarks

Examples of data cited with doi's.

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A paper examining the provenance of the many variants of the Colossal Cave Adventure, with attention to the problems that it raises for digital librarianship and bibliography. The authors (Kirschenbaum, Reside, Fraistat, Jerz) propose the notion of a "Superwork" as an extension to the Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR), and indicate that there are problems of authorship and intellectual property attributes for the metadata that have not yet been resolved. Family trees of ports, modifications, and reimplementations, as well as Expressions and Entity Relationships, help to illustrate their case, and are fascinating in their own right. The work they are doing here may be both instructive for traditional bibliographic study (i.e., variant title pages across multiple editions printed by a variety of publishers in different locals), and for the study and bibliography of the source code and expressions for early works of AI, like SHRDLU and ELIZA.

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An extremely thorough piece of scholarship, by Dennis G. Jerz, looking at the Colossal Cave Adventure phenomenon. The author is able to recover Will Crowther's original source code via Don Woods, through the help of Stanford backup tapes. This helps to establish a much more precise chronology for Adventure, and, for the first time, compare the original Crowther code with Woods' additions. There is a walkthrough of sections of Crowther's code (which is made available), inspired by Knuth's 1998 use of a re-commented Adventure as the exemplar for literate programming. A second component of the paper presents photographs from a 2005 caving expedition by the same club of which Crowther was originally a member (Cave Research Foundation), artfully juxtaposing photographs of the real cave with text from Crowther's code. These, along with some of the Crowthers' original maps, clearly show that the spaces described were based on a real cave, including the "TWISTY LITTLE PASSAGES, ALL ALIKE."

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Inform is a language for constructing text adventure games, for which there are multi-platform distributions (Mac OS X, Windows, Linux), and open sources. "Guided by contemporary work in semantics" it is designed to make it as easy as possible for non-programmers to write interactive fiction.

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Theresa Scott at Vanderbilt holds weekly R clinics where anyone at the university can come with their R challenges. She then posts the solutions they find in the clinics on the web. (Found via a link on Jeromy Anglim's blog)

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This isn't the only way to do it, but figuring out how to display R (and other code) well in blog posts certainly eases effective discussion of technical problems. Jeromy Anglim points to Greg Houston's web-script for pretty-printing code.

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An R library designed to produce interaction plots that include standard error bars. It's not clear to me whether it is possible to specify your own confidence interval using this library. The bars can be offset slightly so that they do not overlap. They do not include the whiskers at the top and bottom of the error bars.

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A useful quick tutorial on ANOVA with R. Only includes One Way and Two Way Factorial designs. Does include a note on within designs, and a function which presents means (but not interactions), with canned confidence intervals.

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Post which which looks at the problem of producing error bars in R. There are some useful comments attached to the post as well on how to apply jitter, and how to use ggplot2 to produce similar results.

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One of the clearest blog posts I've seen addressing the perennial problem (for psychologists) of how you can get R to generate the same p values for you under ANOVA that SPSS does.

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