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Links 1 through 10 of 352 Andrea Niosi's Bookmarks

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A grassroots organization of democratic workplaces dedicated to building workplace democracy in the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond.

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Carol Zabin, Associate Chair, UC Berkeley Labor Center |

September 29, 2004

Study analyzes the adequacy of wages for San Francisco’s hotel workers, based upon 2003 employment data. The author tests for adequacy/inadequacy using the “Self-Sufficiency Standard,” a unique measure taking into account such factors as local cost-of-living, family size and composition, ages of dependent children, and so on. The author determines that 2003 workers’ wages were doubly inadequate, given the industry’s wage rates per se, and the lack of full-time employment opportunities in the sector.

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The DOL Wage and Hour Division (WHD) is responsible for enforcing some of our nation’s most comprehensive federal labor laws on topics, including the minimum wage, overtime pay, recordkeeping, child labor and special employment, family and medical leave, migrant workers, lie detector tests, worker protections in certain temporary worker programs, and the prevailing wages for government service and construction contracts.

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Effective January 1, 2002 as amended)

(Updated as of January 1, 2006

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Public Health Reports | 2011 Supplement 3 | Volume 126

In collaboration with university and community partners, the San Francisco Department of Public Health used an observational checklist to assess preventable occupational

injury hazards and compliance with employee notification requirements in 106 restaurants in San Francisco’s Chinatown. Sixty-five percent of restaurants had not posted required minimum wage, paid sick leave, or workers’ compensation notifications

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Robert Drago and Vicky Lovell | Institute for Women's Policy Research

This study examines the effects of San Francisco’s recent paid sick days legislation on employees and employers. New survey evidence is presented on how paid sick days are being used, the costs and benefits for employees and employers, and rates of employer compliance.

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