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Links 1 through 10 of 25 by Rob Walker tagged imaginarybrands

"Telemundo is signing licensing deals with manufacturers to develop products that can be integrated into programming like telenovelas." These are products developed specifically to be sold through integration -- created to be defictionalized. Richline Jewelry is first example, as I understand it.

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"Fifteen phony products — including a gasoline-powered alarm clock — won a label from the government certifying them as energy efficient in a test of the federal "Energy Star" program." Funny. Thx: Matt B!

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Examples. Via @muzellec.

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"Did the founders of these businesses neglect to do a quick Google search before setting their names in legal stone, or did they hope to capitalize on the intimidation factor of naming their companies after sinister fictional corporations?"

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Glady Santiago posts a video from an Australian show called Hungry Beast on the topic that she's been more on top of than anybody. It's interesting to hear the guy talk about how product displacement (using props that look like a known brand, but aren't -- like UDS instead of UPS; see Santiago's blog for more) can actually help the real tweaked brand. The idea is that it "engages" the consumer.

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"If you’ve seen the Filet-O-Fish commercial McDonald’s airs for Lent, then you’re familiar with “Frankie the Fish” and his infectious jingle. Not being one to miss an opportunity to capitalize on kitschy sentimentality, McDonald’s has released a “Frankie the Fish” novelty frame."

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Dylar from Don DeLillo's White Noise (no more fear of death); Can-D in Philip K Dick's The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch (allows you to participate in a group hallucination).

But as in life, so in literature, and not all fictional drugs are this appetising. Pretty much anything in William Gibson's work, for instance, gives me the heebie-jeebies (betaphenethylamine from Neuromancer, Dancer in Virtual Light, whiz in Mona Lisa Overdrive, The Fear in Red Star, Winter Orbit). Substance D in Dick's A Scanner Darkly is an unholy combination of LSD and crack cocaine: super-addictive, immediate, neurologically corrosive, brutal, deadly. Mimezine in Bruce Wagner's brilliant graphic novel Wild Palms is the designer drug from hell.

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"We were looking for something different," she says, taking a closer look at the label, which is practically the same as the design on the cans in the cartoon. "When someone offers you Duff, I guess you just have to try it."

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A link from AdFreak? I'm starting think people actually look at Murketing.com. Someday I'll be famous! Anyway more on imaginary brands, including comments from AdFreak readers. Worth a look if you like the topic.

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Follow-up on Eyecube contains other interesting examples.

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