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Links 1 through 10 of 1231 Missouri S&T's Bookmarks

Some day, your smartphone might completely conform to your wrist, and when it does, it might be covered in pure gold, thanks to researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology. Writing in the journal Science, the Missouri S&T researchers say they have developed a way to “grow” thin layers of gold on single crystal wafers of silicon, remove the gold foils, and use them as substrates on which to grow other electronic materials.

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J. David Rogers, a dam expert at Missouri University of Science and Technology who has written books on past dam failures, said long spillways such as the one at Oroville create difficult engineering problems. A 3,000-foot stretch of concrete can shrink 15 feet as it cures, creating gaps between panels. Thermal expansion and contraction over the years reopens gaps, allowing cavitation to expand the holes.

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S&T robotics professor Dr. Zhaozheng Yin said if Trump renews the policy, he'll need to better distinguish between semi and fully autonomous weapons - like war drones.

"It's a challenge to say the will not make any mistakes. They will possibly say the accuracy is 99.99 percent - but even with a 99.99 percent you still have a very slight chance to kill some person."

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How do you win? It starts with changing the way you think about mass transit, says Jeff Schramm, a Missouri University of Science and Technology expert on mass transportation and technology. Public transportation can be anything that gets you where you're going — whether it's on rails or hailed through an app.

"Think of mass transportation as part of the vacation," he says. "It’s a way to experience a new place and learn about it and the people that live and work there."

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“It has been a long-standing question in the field as to why large colonies of ants use less per-capita energy than small colonies,” says Dr. Chen Hou, assistant professor of biological sciences at Missouri S&T and lead researcher of the paper. “In this work, we found that this is because in large colonies, there are relatively more ‘lazy workers,’ who don’t move around, and therefore don’t consume energy.”

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Electronic components that can be elongated or twisted – known as “stretchable” electronics – could soon be used to power electronic gadgets, the onboard systems of vehicles, medical devices and other products. And a 3-D printing-like approach to manufacturing may help make stretchable electronics more prevalent, say researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology.

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“Electronic components that can be elongated or twisted . . . could soon be used to power electronic gadgets, the onboard systems of vehicles, medical devices and other products,” writes Andrew Careaga on the Missouri University of Science and Technology (Missouri S&T; Rolla) website. University researchers explain how the combination of 3D printing techniques with elastomers can achieve these properties in a paper titled, “ Materials, Mechanics and Patterning Techniques for Elastomer-based Stretchable Conductors .”

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A team of researchers from Missouri University of Science and Technology and National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in Greece have demonstrated a more efficient, less cost-prohibitive way to split water into its elements of hydrogen and oxygen. Their approach could make hydrogen fuel a more viable energy source in the future while addressing the technological challenge of developing clean and renewable energy without depleting earth's natural preserves.

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Genda Chen of Missouri University of Science and Technology has a more unusual proposal: to throw magnetic “rocks” (artificial boulders with magnets embedded inside them) into the river. These rocks roll around in the riverbed until they settle in dips in the sediment, which are generally places where erosion is at its greatest. Sensors fitted to a bridge’s piers then estimate the amount of scouring, and where it is, from the strength and direction of the magnetic field they detect.

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Dr. Joseph Smith, the Wayne and Gayle Laufer Chair of Energy and director of the Energy Research and Development Center at Missouri S&T, says there are three main factors affecting the oil market -- and thus gas prices.

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