Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share This URL With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

1-10 of Kim Plowright's Bookmarks with the Tag Bundle domestic

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Research has indicated that many video games and virtual worlds are populated by unrealistic, hypersexualized representations of women, but the effects of embodying these representations remains understudied. The Proteus effect proposed by Yee and Bailenson (2007) suggests that embodiment may lead to shifts in self-perception both online and offline based on the avatar’s features or behaviors. A 2 × 2 experiment, the first of its kind, examined how self-perception and attitudes changed after women (N = 86) entered a fully immersive virtual environment and embodied sexualized or nonsexualized avatars which featured either the participant’s face or the face of an unknown other. • Sexualized avatars promoted more self-objectification than nonsexualized avatars. • Sexualized selves promoted more rape myth acceptance than others. • The Proteus effect was supported: sexualized avatars affected self-perception. January 12, 2014 at 11:50AM via Pocket

Share It With Others!

Via someone on twitter, now cant find the tweet. Researcher reveals how “Computer Geeks” replaced “Computer Girls” by Brenda D. Frink on Wednesday, June 1, 2011 - 2:03am Asked to picture a computer programmer, most of us describe the archetypal computer geek, a brilliant but socially-awkward male. We imagine him as a largely noctural creature, passing sleepless nights writing computer code. According to workplace researchers, this stereotype of the lone male computer whiz is self-perpetuating, and it keeps the computer field overwhelming male. Not only do hiring managers tend to favor male applicants, but women are less likely to pursue careers a field where feel they won’t fit in. It may be surprising, then, to learn that the earliest computer programmers were women and that the programming field was once stereotyped as female.

Share It With Others!

THE "EMPIRE" STRIKES BACK: A POSTTRANSSEXUAL MANIFESTO Sandy Stone Current academic affiliation: Department of Radio, Television and Film, the University of Texas at Austin This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License 3.0 permitting non-commercial sharing with attribution. As a courtesy, I'd appreciate if you'd drop me a note when you reprint it. Publication history: Version 1.0 written 1987. First presented at "Other Voices, Other Worlds: Questioning Gender and Ethnicity," Santa Cruz, CA, 1988. First published in Kristina Straub and Julia Epstein, eds.: "Body Guards: The Cultural Politics of Gender Ambiguity" (New York: Routledge 1991).

Share It With Others!

Suggested Rules for Non-Transsexuals Writing about Transsexuals, Transsexuality, Transsexualism, or Trans ____. Still under construction. Dig we must. Sorry about the formatting and colors. Written by Jacob Hale, with thanks to Talia Bettcher, Dexter D. Fogt, Judith Halberstam, and Naomi Scheman. Note that the list refers to transsexuality rather than to transgender per se. However, many items also apply to non-transgendered researchers writing about transgender, as well as to trans-folk writing across trans-trans differences.

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Data sources within the NHS

Share It With Others!