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Links 1 through 10 of 233 by Kim Plowright tagged history

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Pre-Pottery Neolithic archaeology in Turkey. 'First the temple, then the city'

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As someone else has noted, the so-called "ASCII art" master(?)pieces not only predate FTP, they predate the electronic computer by a long time.  Back in the 1950s one of the amateur radio magazines (probably _CQ_) would print examples of the Christmas cards that hams had created using their TeleType machines (and I don't think that I ever saw one that used overprinting), but the hams routinely credited the origin of the practice to the pre-WWII teleprinter operators. One variant of the "nekkid lady" printout that I've not seen mentioned here was the strip-tease.  At my PPOE back in the 1960s there was a program that ran on the 1401 (from a tape drive) that allowed the operator to print several picture of a woman on the 1403 printer, removing articles of clothing by changing the sense switch settings. the last printout (with all clothing "removed") put her behind a modesty panel.

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Edith These sorts of images were created in BCD code on the IBM 1401 (introduced in 1959) and in EBCDIC on IBM 360. On the IBM 1401, in the early 60s, there was a woman generated by a program named EDIE or EDITH. Her clothes could be removed in stages depending on the state of front-panel "sense" switches. Sense switch B changed her to dress to a halter-top and short skirt. Switch C turned it to a tiny bikini.   Switch D was the bikini with a "modesty panel" that said something like "Sorry, there are some things you can't do even with an IBM 1401" or "Contrary to popular opinion, even IBM can't do everything!".   Switch E changed it to a fully nude Edith, with a caption "See, you really can do anything with an IBM 1401."  This image was also available on the Univac 1004 in the early 60s.

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Oof. This is disturbing reading.

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Close Enjoy this article by switching to Readability view » (What's Readability?) September 22, 2013 at 09:57PM via Pocket

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A selection of Valentine's Day greetings telegram forms issued by the General Post Office, and a variety of unadopted Valentine's Day greetings telegram designs commissioned by the General Post Office. Date: 1930s-1960s

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