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Links 1 through 10 of 40 by Kris Van den Bergh tagged research

Electroencephalography (EEG) is the recording of electrical activity along the scalp produced by the firing of neurons within the brain.[2] In clinical contexts, EEG refers to the recording of the brain's spontaneous electrical activity over a short period of time, usually 20–40 minutes, as recorded from multiple electrodes placed on the scalp. In neurology, the main diagnostic application of EEG is in the case of epilepsy, as epileptic activity can create clear abnormalities on a standard EEG study.[3] A secondary clinical use of EEG is in the diagnosis of coma, encephalopathies, and brain death. EEG used to be a first-line method for the diagnosis of tumors, stroke and other focal brain disorders, but this use has decreased with the advent of anatomical imaging techniques such as MRI and CT.

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Alvin Toffler (born October 4, 1928 in New York City[2]) is an American writer and futurist, known for his works discussing the digital revolution, communication revolution, corporate revolution and technological singularity.

A former associate editor of Fortune magazine, his early work focused on technology and its impact (through effects like information overload). Then he moved to examining the reaction of and changes in society. His later focus has been on the increasing power of 21st century military hardware, weapons and technology proliferation, and capitalism.

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My research spans applied computer security and tech-centric public policy. Topics that interest me include software security, data privacy, electronic voting, digital rights management, and cybercrime, as well as technological aspects of intellectual property law and government regulation.

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A Proof-of-work ("POW") system (or protocol, or function) is an economic measure to deter denial of service attacks and other service abuses such as spams on a network by requiring some work from the service requester, usually meaning processing time by a computer. A key feature of these schemes is their dissymmetry: the work must be moderately hard (hard but feasible) on the requester side but easy to check for the service provider. This idea is also named Client Puzzle Protocol (CPP). It is distinct from a CAPTCHA which is intended to be solved quickly by a human, and not a computer.

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Mi Islita is a research site about information retrieval, data mining, and search engine technologies. Our content is frequently referenced or used by both IR scholars and search engine marketers.

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RT @Infosys: Inside Infosys: Do that #Internship with a purpose, whether its #commerce or #research http://twurl.nl/s337o6 #InStep

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Otlet was de pionier van de 'library science': de documentering van de menselijke kennis. Otlet boog zich zijn hele leven over de theoretische, organisatorische en technische aspecten van een belangrijk maatschappelijk probleem: hoe maak je gegevens en kennis toegankelijk voor iedereen? Bestaat er een universeel systeem van classificatie? Alleen al de klassering van alle bestaande boeken in alle talen op fiches van 12 bij 7 cm zou een onmogelijke taak zijn. Hoeveel fiches zou de codificatie van alle gedachten en ideeën van ieder mens dan wel opleveren? Otlet maakte zowel het Mundaneum als de Universele Decimale Classificatie.

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The School for Information and Knowledge Systems (SIKS) is a Dutch Research School established in 1996 and accredited by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. SIKS is a network institute in which over 400 research fellows and Ph.D. students from 11 different universities collaborate.

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