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Links 1 through 10 of 12 by Just Mohit tagged bosses

Average bosses buy into the notion that work is, at best, a necessary evil. They fully expect employees to resent having to work, and therefore tend to subconsciously define themselves as oppressors and their employees as victims. Everyone then behaves accordingly.
Extraordinary bosses see work as something that should be inherently enjoyable–and believe therefore that the most important job of manager is, as far as possible, to put people in jobs that can and will make them truly happy.

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Being a boss is a bit like playing golf. There are 42 bazillion things you can get good advice about and then concentrate on improving. That's part of the fun...
The list is not exhaustive. The order of the items does not indicate priority.
Change means better.
Coordination is making all the parts work together effectively and efficiently.
Control is the "C" word no one seems to want to talk about, but paying attention to it is part of your job.
Care is a verb.
Courtesy and Civility are important.
Connections give meaning to human beings.
Credit should be given.
Consequences must be delivered.
Communication is vital and devilishly hard to get right.
Conversations are an important tool of your trade.
Courage is what you need when things are uncomfortable and scary.

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If your boss is seen as a librarian, she becomes a resource, not a limit. If you view the people you work with as coaches, and your job as a platform, it can transform what you do each day, starting right now. "My boss won't let me," doesn't deserve to be in your vocabulary. Instead, it can become, "I don't want to do that because it's not worth the time/resources." (Or better, it can become, "go!")
The opportunity of our age is to get out of this boss as teacher as taskmaster as limiter mindset. We need more from you than that.

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Ask yourself: "Do I enjoy helping my team and my team members succeed?"
If the answer is "no," you're probably a bad boss and you may want to find something else to do. Helping the team and the team members succeed is what your job is all about and if you don't enjoy it, the odds go way up that you do a lousy job.
Helping the team succeed means concentrating on the important things, keeping everyone focused on the key job and making sure the work gets done. Helping team members succeed means spending a large chunk of your day helping them grow and develop and giving them the freedom to learn from the inevitable mistakes.

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The February edition of Southwest Airlines Spirit magazine has a an article on Good Boss, Bad Boss called Lead the Way.

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Experts say many bosses are similarly clueless about their appearance to employees. Here are five signals you may be one of them.
1. Most of your emails are one-word long
2. You Rarely Talk to Your Employees Face-to-Face
3. Your employees are out sick–a lot.
4. Your team's working overtime, but still missing deadlines.
New bosses are particularly prone to giving unmanageable deadlines to staffers, says Gini Graham Scott, author of "A Survival Guide for Working with Bad Bosses.
5. You yell.

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there used to be a psychological contract: It used to be, we'll take care of you. Now it's more like: Take care of yourself and maybe we'll help if we're in a good mood. People criticize young people for having no loyalty...But why do they owe anybody loyalty? They and their parents have been treated like shit...
You hear a lot of slogans about how companies need "talent." But in the real world, it's hard to believe companies are thinking about talent right now...At any one time, an organization must do three things: Make money...innovate, and keep and maintain talent. They don't always do those three things all at one time...
if you are one of the people with a bad job and a bad boss, the best thing to do is learn the fine art of emotional detachment and not giving a shit at the low moments of your life. That's humbling but it can be pretty constructive. You have to learn not to give a shit about company politics. It's the art of not letting it touch your soul.

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From a practical standpoint, however, the best bosses realize that “time was invented because you can’t do everything all at once.” They push for performance and put humanity on the back burner at times, but, as IDEO founder David Kelley explains in Good Boss, Bad Boss, they build-up humanity credits or what he calls “love points” by doing things like taking out time to have a little fun or give people assignments that may not be especially profitable to the company, but are of great intrinsic interest to the person in question – either to “make-up” for a period of dull or stressful work — or to build up some points to burn later.

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Failure is inevitable, so the key to success is to be good at learning from it. The ability to capitalize on hard-won experience is a hallmark of the greatest organizations...
You forgive because it is impossible to run an organization without making mistakes, and pointing fingers and holding grudges creates a climate of fear. You remember — and talk about the mistakes openly — so people and the system can learn. And you also remember so that you'll notice if some people keep making the same mistakes, even after being taught how to avoid them...
A vital difference between good and bad bosses is that the former consider it their responsibility to surface and learn from past setbacks, errors, and failure. They apply their management skills and dedication to building trust and an atmosphere of psychological safety. These are the kinds of bosses we need more of...Not bosses that demand no mistakes, but bosses who help their organizations stop making the same ones.

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One of the defining, and most crucial, features of effective bosses is that they shield their followers — whether from political maneuvering or resource grabbing or just the innumerable distractions, indignities, time suckers, lame rules, and local idiots that go with organizational life — and create the space for them to succeed. (The best...have the self-awareness to know when they themselves are the source of any of that, and need to shelter people from their own worst tendencies.)...
When someone has their boss's backing, it's an emotional relief as well as a material one. In tough times, or facing new risks, people feel highly vulnerable and their feelings of safety and esteem can evaporate...
you may think you are constantly doing the same type of thing. And maybe you are. But remember...research suggests that bosses tend to be poor judges of what it feels like to work for them. Don't assume that it's obvious to your people that you go above and beyond to shield and support them.

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