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Links 1 through 6 of 6 by Jay Cross tagged clojay+Values

In the mid-sixties, computers were magic. The general public had no idea what they were. Mechanical brains.

Computers soon gained a malevolent reputation. They were the epidome of command and control. If we weren’t careful, the computers might get together and take over the world. Dr. Strangelove. Hal 9000. War Games. The East Coast Joint Computer Conference I attended in 1967 was all guys with ties: very corporate. Mainframes were cold things — in refrigerated glass rooms.

Yet when personal computers were born a decade later, they were friendly and benevolent.

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The internet is such an all- consuming, pervasive model for business and society that the values inherent in the net are blowing back into RL (real life). For example, when I find myself in a boring situation, I have no qualms about leaving. It matters not that I was sitting in the front row and the speaker is supposedly a luminary. I learned this from clicking out of dullsville on the web. The values of the Internet Culture are the strongest foundation upon which to evolve a next-generation learnscape. At Learning Technologies, I will talk about the thinking that underpins successful informal learning networks such as togetherlearn. Learning professionals need to be cognisant of these tenets of internet culture: These are the four areas that will be included in my talk for successful informal learning.

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you are the most important person in the universe.
so is everyone else.

-e. e. cummings

Ultimately, you're responsible for the life you lead. It's up to you to learn what you need to succeed. That makes you responsible for your own knowledge management, learning architecture, instructional design and evaluation.

Professionally, we design learning experiences to meet concrete objectives. We plan ahead to prepare for the future. We try to avoid reinventing the wheel. We build systems to leverage the knowledge we already possess. We gather feedback so we can do better next time.

Personally, we should do no less. Intellectual capital is what separates winners from losers, and I want the best I can get. My personal learning and knowledge management are too important to leave to chance. So are yours.

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When I tell training vendors "courses are dead," they look at me as if I'd brought a skunk to their picnic.

Roger Shank sums up the failure of training in four little words: "It's just like school." The better part of two decades of schooling has brainwashed, er convinced, us that courses are the default means of learning. People think of courses as the basic, fundamental model against which other modes must compare themselves. Propose that workers learn something through conversation, a game, or trial and error, and the knee-jerk response is "How do you know it will be as effective as a course"

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Small wonder that executives hear the word "learning," think "schooling" and conclude "not enough payback." Executives respond better to "execution."

Everything is connected. Each of us is enmeshed in innumerable networks. You're linked to telephone networks, satellite networks, cable feeds, power grids, ATM networks, the banking system, the Web, intranets, extranets and networks that are local, wide, wireless, secure, virtual and peer-to-peer.

Social networks interconnect us in families, circles of friends, neighborhood groups, professional associations, task teams, business webs, value nets, user groups, flash mobs, gangs, political groups, scout troops, bridge clubs, 12-step groups and alumni associations.

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Astute CLOs keep all their programs in beta. A dozen years ago, software developers said a program was “in beta” if it was nearly finished but not ready for release. (“Alpha” meant the application was a collection of scraps that only a developer could run.)

Netscape changed the meaning of beta forever. Instead of limiting beta tests to a small, handpicked group of users outside the company, Netscape posted beta releases on the Internet. Anyone could download the latest beta version. Many of us did. Improvements in the Web’s early days came fast and furious, so we downloaded betas time after time after time. Netscape received feedback and suggestions from thousands of users. This accelerated product development, and that led to even more frequent beta releases. Running the most recent beta version was a sign of derring-do.

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