Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 9 of 9 by Jay Cross tagged clojay+Metrics

The sooner workers are productive, the larger their contribution to the organization. This makes time-to-performance, the amount of time required to begin performing at target levels, a vital metric. 

Share It With Others!

Today’s networked era requires a new way to make investment decisions that incorporates intangible assets and more accurately depicts how value is created.

The industrial age has run out of steam. Look at General Motors. Look at Chrysler. We are witnessing the death throes of management models that have outlived their usefulness.

The network era now replacing the industrial age holds great promise. Networked organizations are reaping rewards for connecting people, know-how and ideas at an ever-faster pace. Value creation has migrated from what we can see (physical assets) to intangibles (ideas). Look at Google and Cisco.

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Executives don’t want learning; they want execution. They want performance. Informal does not mean unintentional. Those who leave informal learning to chance leave money on the table. Informal lear...

Share It With Others!

ROI is often a mask for uncertainty or an attempt to quantify cost-benefit with accounting principles that don't count people as assets. I contend that the business return on an e-learning investment should be so obvious that you can figure it out on the back of a napkin.

Traditionally, executives assume training has little or no impact on revenue, so they measure training benefits in terms of cost savings. This works against e-learning, in which increases in top-line revenue generally exceed reduced expenses by a wide margin. Enter metrics.

Share It With Others!

Ask me, I'll tell you: Return-on-investment isn't what it used to be.

This traditional financial measure, developed by DuPont and once credited with making General Motors manageable, hasn't kept pace with the times. The R is no longer the famous bottom line and the I is more likely a subscription fee than a one-time payment.

Until recently, most training decisions were incremental. Training sponsors had most of the infrastructure required: an empty room, staff, flipcharts, markers, perhaps some personal computers. Business unit managers could evaluate the cost-effectiveness of one-shot training courses by assessing cost and effect within their own business units. E-learning changes this, though.

E-learning is a continuous process, not a one-shot deal. It is most often an enterprisewide initiative, beyond the bounds of any individual business unit. And investing in e-learning is often a strategic imperative--the entry ticket to an e-business environment.

Share It With Others!

Businesses exist to create value, and the source of value resides outside the learning function. As Peter Drucker has pointed out, "Neither results nor resources exist inside the business. Both exist outside. The customer is the business."

Try to imagine a business without customers, perhaps an insurance company on a desert island or a manufacturer that never ships. No value, right

Training directors bemoan not being able to demonstrate significant business results. If they remain entirely within the training function, they never will, because they don't own the yardstick that measures business results. Generally, it's training's sponsor, the person with authority to sign off on large expenditures. This is usually a company officer who can weigh the potential returns and costs of various investments and select those likely to create the highest net value. Since the sponsor decides training programs' economic fate, it's worthwhile to contemplate how sponsors typically make decisions

Share It With Others!

When Pacioli invented double-entry bookkeeping to measure shipping in Venice 500 years ago, intangibles didn't count for anything. Of course, the stock prices of companies such as Google indicate things have changed in our times.

Yet, business managers still act as if something invisible is worthless because it can't be seen and sized up. Vestiges of Industrial Age thinking about value live on inside corporate walls. ROI is a useful concept, but it's not if you leave out the intangibles.

Measuring intangibles involves making judgment calls, so managers often exclude these factors from their calculations. These people tote up the numbers for things they can see and count, and then they list intangibles on the side, as if this keeps their calculations pure. This is nonsense.

Share It With Others!

It's all a matter of learning, but it's not the sort of learning that is the province of training departments, workshops and classrooms. At work we learn more in the break room than in the classroom. We discover how to do our jobs through informal learning-observing others, asking the person in the next cubicle, calling the help desk, trial and error and simply working with people in the know. Formal learning-classes and workshops and online events-is the source of only 10 percent to 20 percent of what we learn at work.

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT