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Links 1 through 10 of 162 by Ho John Lee tagged privacy

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Future of Privacy Forum is pleased to share the third annual “Privacy Papers for Policy Makers,” showcasing leading analytical thinking about current and emerging privacy issues.

Leading Privacy Papers:

Bringing the Gap Between Privacy and Design
Deirdre Mulligan and Jennifer King

‘Going Dark’ Versus a ‘Golden Age for Surveillance’
Peter Swire and Kenesa Ahmad

“How Come I’m Allowing Strangers to Go Through My Phone”?: Smart Phones and Privacy Expectations
Jennifer King

Mobile Payments: Consumer Benefits & New Privacy Concerns
Chris Jay Hoofnagle, Jennifer M. Urban, and Su Li

Smart, Useful, Scary, Creepy: Perceptions of Online Behavioral Advertising
Blase Ur, Pedro G. Leon, Lorrie Faith Cranor, Richard Shay and Yang Wang

The ‘Re-Identification’ of Governor William Weld’s Medical Information: A Critical
Re-Examination of Health Data Identification Risks and Privacy Protections, Then and Now
Daniel Barth-Jones

Privacy by Design: A Counterfactual Analysis of Google and Facebook Pri

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The Federal Trade Commission today released a staff report "Facing Facts: Best Practices for Common Uses of Facial Recognition Technologies" for the increasing number of companies using facial recognition technologies, to help them protect consumers’ privacy as they use the technologies to create innovative new commercial products and services.

Facial recognition technologies have been adopted in a variety of contexts, ranging from online social networks and mobile apps to digital signs, the FTC staff report states. They have a number of potential uses, such as determining an individual’s age range and gender in order to deliver targeted advertising; assessing viewers’ emotions to see if they are engaged in a video game or a movie; or matching faces and identifying anonymous individuals in images.

Facial recognition also has raised a variety of privacy concerns because – for example – it holds the prospect of identifying anonymous individuals in public, and because the data collect

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There are two cases where the FTC believes that companies need to get a consumer’s “affirmative express consent,” that is, an “opt-in,” before using information captured via facial recognition: When identifying anonymous individuals to third parties that wouldn’t otherwise know who they were, and when using any data or imagery captured via facial recognition for purposes outside of what was initially stated by the company.

In case companies weren’t already aware, the FTC also points out that what’s okay under U.S. law concerning facial recognition technologies might be illegal in other countries.

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Mudhakar Srivatsa, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center
Mike Hicks, University of Maryland
The key idea of our approach is that a user may be identified by those she meets: a contact graph identifying meetings between anonymized users in a set of traces can be structurally correlated with a social network graph, thereby identifying anonymized users. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach using three real world datasets: University of St Andrews mobility trace and social network (27 nodes each), SmallBlue contact trace and Facebook social network (125 nodes), and Infocom 2006 bluetooth contact traces and conference attendees’ DBLP social network (78 nodes). Our experiments show that 80% of users are identified precisely, while only 8% are identified incorrectly, with the remainder mapped to a small set of users

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