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Links 1 through 10 of 77 by Rob Friesel tagged science+fiction

Ryan Britt (at OMNI Reboot): «Thinking about things outside of their regular context might be a lazy definition of sci-fi, but it isn’t wrong.»

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Had this sent to me around the same time that [this other (derived?) image](http://dirkloechel.deviantart.com/art/Size-Comparison-Science-Fiction-spaceships-398790051) was making the rounds. Russell's site is missing my personal favorites (the ships of the Wing Commander universe) but it's an impressive collection nontheless.

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Edited by Alex Dally MacFarlane. Looks like a pretty fantastic anthology--it contains quite a few pieces that I've read before and enjoyed very much. I'm looking forward to this one.

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A phenomenal gender-bending story by Charlie Jane Anders at Lightspeed Magazine. She's one of my favorite contributors at io9 (when I have favorites at io9) and now I have a favorite short story by her.

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By Tom Crosshill, at Lightspeed Magazine. Go read it.

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Clara Moskowitz, writing at Space.com: «The only problem is, previous studies estimated the warp drive would require a minimum amount of energy about equal to the mass-energy of the planet Jupiter.»

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Great list posted over at Wondermark. (Via... Prismatic? @fogus? All of the above? *None* of the above?) Some familiar titles in there, and some others I've never heard of. Either way: "As if my to-read list weren't long enough..."

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By Jon Korn, at LitReactor. A decent intro/guide for PKD neophytes, and I agree with most of his points. But to that, I would add that you will want to read his novel "Ubik", as well as the short stories "Faith of Our Fathers" and "The Eyes Have It".

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Steven Padnick, writing at Tor.com:

«And the red matter in Star Trek (2009) is my favorite example of just cold not explaining anything. First off, it does not try to hide the fictional nature of the substance behind a scientific sounding name. It’s not a dilithium crystal. It’s fucking “red matter.” (Ironically, in giving it a dumb name, it sounds more like real scientific concepts like dark matter and the Big Bang.) Secondly, red matter is a big ball of red... let’s say paint? That makes black holes. That are also sometimes wormholes into an alternate timeline. Why? Because that’s what the writers needed it to do.»

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At io9: «There is another, albeit more radical possibility — and one that has likely not been considered in the scientific literature. The Boötes void could be the result of an expanding Kardashev III scale civilization. As the colonization bubble expands outward from its home system, the civilization dims each star (and subsequently each galaxy) it encounters by blanketing it in a Dyson shell. This might also explain why the void has such a nice, spherical shape. Given that the void is about 700 million light-years from Earth, and that intelligent life could have emerged in the Universe about 4 billion years ago, this ancient civilization may have had enough time to perform this astonishing feat of cosmological engineering. Now, this is pure speculation, but it's worth throwing it out there as a possibility given the strangeness of the phenomenon.»

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