Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share This URL With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

Links 1 through 10 of 33 by Dave Earley tagged online

"the key message: don’t spend thousands on old-style marketing, do it all yourself, for free, online.
* why online marketing is important for journalists
* once you’ve created good content, how to get it out there
* why a niche is important and how to define one"

Share It With Others!

"The problem with journalism on the web today is that it’s being contaminated by the web form factor.
Journalism is being pushed into a space where I don't think it should ever go, where it's trying to support the monetization model of the Web by driving page views. "

Share It With Others!

"In a country with an adult (15+) population of 50m, that's pretty good penetration. If we allow for the fact that most titles will be read by two or three people, then it shows that we remain a nation of avid newspaper-readers"

Share It With Others!

"It's easy to kick Blockbuster, which filed for bankruptcy protection in September, now that they're down, but the company's overconfidence regarding Netflix can provide lessons today.
"We were I think five years to $500 million and another three years to a $1 billion, all because of the subscription model."
"McCarthy told the Unofficial Stanford blog that for Blockbuster it was a classic case of the innovator's dilemma: "You end up competing with a business that you initially ignored."

Share It With Others!

"If you're launching a website or app today, you need to build a community around your content. But how? Some sites explode while other nearly identical sites wither. It seems the best you can do sometimes is put out content and start sacrificing goats."
Section I: Locating Identity
Section II: External Forces
Section III: Material Culture

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

"Nielsen claim the number of people in Australia watching video online has risen from 25.2% in 2006 to 79.1% in 2009 so, with more and more people watching video online in Australia and interest growing at a rapid rate, why the lack of content in Australia?"

Share It With Others!

"Are Australians abandoning the news? Drawing on new survey material Sally Young looks at the drift away from conventional news and the evidence about where audiences are going.
...the audience to watch in the near future is not the elite audience, who will be better-served by the internet and new media [...] but the general news audience [...] who used to watch TV news but are now switching off. If they [replace TV with something else], it may be a very different concept of news in the future"

Share It With Others!

"Only 10% of newspapers offered social networking tools, such as user profiles and the ability to friend others. Even though this is low, it is still an increase from 5% in 2007.

Similarly more newspapers are experimenting with user-generated content but largely when it comes to photos. The study found that 58% allowed for user generated photos. Only 18% accepted video and 15% took content written by the audience.

This is hardly surprising as mainstream media tend to use user content to complement their newsgathering, such as providing photos from the scene of breaking news."

Share It With Others!

Terry Heaton takes a shot at the unending "woe, the internetz!" cries of mainstream media.
"we’d get a lot further in the reinvention of professional journalism if we could get away from the belief that its an entitlement, one that’s necessary for the survival of the species [...]
"Who do we think we are? Surely our hubris has blinded us, for professional journalism never was God’s gift to culture [...] We have done some good things, but our arrogance was our undoing. That arrogance is behind the notions that 'real journalism' can’t be practiced outside the paradigm of contemporary professional news."

Share It With Others!