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Links 1 through 10 of 39 by Dave Earley tagged mediaindustry

The main message: The future's already here.
The total market value of "new media" companies is now equal to the total value of "old media" companies.

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There's lucrative opportunity to reach out to former newspaper advertisers and become a more trusted source of local news.

"WJBK VP/General Manager Jeff Murri says subscribers number around 5,000, and the base is growing significantly every day. “It's an easy way for former newspaper readers to get their morning news. Clearly these people are looking for alternative sources of information.”

As major markets such as Seattle and Denver have said goodbye to well-established dailies, and the likes of San Francisco and Boston ponder a future without papers [...] local television executives are studying what new prospects await them in a paper-free world. There's lucrative opportunity to reach out to former newspaper advertisers and, perhaps even more significant, there's a chance to become a more trusted source of local news."

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Great quote from Anna Quindlen in her farewell column for Newsweek, on the hope of "what journalism ought to be", after reading submissions for the Livingston Awards.

"The next time anyone insists the business won't survive I may bash him with one of these binders, which are heavy with hope for the future."

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Post by Tim Burrowes, inspired by thoughts from Jason Whittaker, with comments from PANPA CEO Mark Hollands. This thread is a must read :)
"Until, suddenly, they weren’t monopolies any more. People could get their news - such that it was - elsewhere and do their advertising online. It wasn’t that the newspaper-finds-out-interesting-things, reader-buys-it, advertiser-advertises model was broken, it’s just that managements started trying to do the first bit on the cheap."

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"Are Australians abandoning the news? Drawing on new survey material Sally Young looks at the drift away from conventional news and the evidence about where audiences are going.
...the audience to watch in the near future is not the elite audience, who will be better-served by the internet and new media [...] but the general news audience [...] who used to watch TV news but are now switching off. If they [replace TV with something else], it may be a very different concept of news in the future"

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"The evidence suggests that publicly listed media companies are digging their own graves. Does this mean a return to the age of moguls, asks Jonathan Este"

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'The discussion about journalism’s future so often focuses on Big Changes — Kill the print edition! Flips for everyone! Reinvent business models NOW! — that it’s easy to forget how simple innovation can be. 'Sometimes all you need is a few Tweets, a bunch of links, and some like-minded pioneers. 'That’s how a quiet revolution began in Washington state Wednesday. Four journalists spontaneously launched one of the first experiments in collaborative (or networked) link journalism to cover a major local story...'

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"it seems to be gospel in a lot of pessimistic circles that online revenue simply isn't enough to support a traditional newsgathering operation, and that that's an insoluble problem.
Hogwash. Online revenue has been rising steadily–even in the current downturn, at some places–and is able to cover more and more of the costs of news organizations, as the LA Times case demonstrates. [...] Newspaper online operations need to move more aggressively to get past the banner ad and sell new advertising products to new advertisers. The money's out there–they just need to go get it. It's not as easy as selling print used to be."

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"What we NEED is LARGER STORIES: We need someone to tell us what last night’s city council meeting means for us; Or what last night’s game means for our team; Or what Obama’s cabinet choices mean for our country. [...]
Our news formats are not flexible enough to handle the pace of most news stories"

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