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Links 1 through 10 of 16 by Wess Daniels tagged teaching

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I am still working on the lecture outline but I have completed (for the most part) the handouts that the students will be receiving in class on Tuesday. Here is one of them. This handout presents the general flow of continental philosophy and the trajectories philosophers have moved in and who has influenced them. Let me know if you have any comments or questions about it. Even though its not impeccable I hope it will be a helpful resource for the students.

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Blogs considerably raise the profile of University professors, which is good for the University. Through their archive of posts, professors advertise their expertise in a given field. Establishing that authority leads calls from the media — and the University's name appearing in print.

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Before teaching a course on virtual community and social media, I probe issues of attention, hyperattention, multitasking raised by our media practices today -- including WiFi in the classroom -- by asking students to start paying attention to their attention.

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Cathy Whitmire will be joining us for our Second All-Meeting Retreat on January 24th to help us develop our skills in individual and corporate discernment. Pablo S from Worship and Ministry committee compiled the following list of reading material on discernment and decision making. We hope you will prepare for the retreat by reading as much as you can from this list or other sources that you have. We encourage you to share your thoughts from the readings with friends at lunch, over coffee, or in your reading groups.

Be sure to save the January 24th date and join us for the day. Bring a friend who is curious but might not come without your encouragement. Tentatively, we plan to start with lunch, with optional work parties in the morning, and we will have a talent show in the evening.

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New Religions in Global Perspective is the first truly worldwide account of the new religious movements that are currently the fastest-growing faith phenomenon in many parts of the globe. Ranging from North America and Europe to Japan, Latin America, South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean, the book provides students with a complete introduction to groups such as Falun Gong, Soka Gakkai, the Brahma Kumaris, the Nation of Islam, Messianic Judaism, Rastafarianism, the Peyote cult, and Brazilian Candomble. Peter Clarke explores the dramatic rise of these enormously varied movements, charting their cultural significance and global impact, and discussing their place in a modern world of constant religious change. He also considers the many important ways in which their status as new religions is defined and understood, from genuinely unprecedented faiths with strictly modern roots to others that manifest themselves as new forms of Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Paganism.

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The Socratic method of teaching is based on Socrates' theory that it is more important to enable students to think for themselves than to merely fill their heads with "right" answers. Therefore, he regularly engaged his pupils in dialogues by responding to their questions with questions, instead of answers. This process encourages divergent thinking rather than convergent.

Students are given opportunities to "examine" a common piece of text, whether it is in the form of a novel, poem, art print, or piece of music. After "reading" the common text "like a love letter", open-ended questions are posed.

Open-ended questions allow students to think critically, analyze multiple meanings in text, and express ideas with clarity and confidence. After all, a certain degree of emotional safety is felt by participants when they understand that this format is based on dialogue and not discussion/debate.

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