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Links 1 through 10 of 864 by David Tames tagged kinoeyepicks

A detailed article telling the story of Flickr and how Yahoo, "bought it and murdered it and screwed itself out of relevance along the way." It's a cautionary tale for any online business.

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Hester Blum offers Application Advice. She writes, "This year I have read over 740 applications for positions or money in academe – jobs, postdocs, research fellowships, grad awards, collaborative grants and more. In the course of reading applications I've noticed a few small things that are consistently seen in applications and that I feel should not be seen in applications, however modest their degree of offense might be. Since some of these are things that are not routinely covered by the many very good guides to writing applications, I thought I would share them."

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We need to place focus on the art of documentary storytelling, passion and subject matter are not enough?

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Ted Hope writes: We are awash in wonderful opportunities. Distribution has long been said to be one of the top concerns of Truly Free / Indie filmmakers. Ditto on the marketing side. We've been neglectful to address the equally important social side, but that's changing. Financing is always a challenge, but even there we have new help and hope. The great news is that never before have we had so many opportunities in all these areas. Now comes the time to develop some best practices. How do we use all of these wonderful opportunities? How do we prepare for them? How do we access them? Here's a list of the 27 platforms & tools I know of; I am sure you know some more to add to the list. Let's get this new model started! How about everyone pick a platform (ideally one they used) and write up some recommendations on how to use it well, and we run them as posts on this blog?

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While whiteboards long have been staples in conference rooms, companies such as Facebook Inc. are incorporating whiteboards, chalkboards and writable glass on all sorts of surfaces to spark creativity.

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Chris Dorr writes: Yet there is one screen that is not getting connected, where there is little innovation and where the future is being delayed. The industry (the major movie studios) that controls this screen restricts innovation and is holding off the future. I am, of course, referring to the last screen to be connected to the Internet—the screen at your local movie theater.

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Tiffany Shlain writes: I think when they look back on this period of time, it will be called “The Age of Collaboration.” People around the world are able to share strategies when catastrophe strikes; scientists are opening up problems to gamers to solve previously unsolvable problems, and artists and inventors can gather groups of supporters to help them fund their projects. My team at The Moxie Institute and I are cloudsourcing creativity to tell collaborative, universal stories that can be used by organizations all over the world.

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Bob Connolly expresses concerns that one-off documentaries are falling out of favor with commissioning editor [support for the art of the lone documentary maker could be waning]

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Will Robert Kyncl and YouTube revolutionize television? John Seabrook tells the story of how YouTube is growing up and hopes to serve their viewers a cornucopia of channels produced by channel partners with whom they will share ad revenue. This is no less than a profound revolution in the making that will change the nature of broadcast television forever, and usher in a brave new world of video content produced by a constellation of producers rather than an oligopoly of corporations.

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Independent documentary filmmaker Lee Storey has won her long battle with the Internal Revenue Service over deductions related to her film, Smile ’til it Hurts: The Up with People Story. The IRS’s case against Story panicked the documentary community as it was poised to declare documentary filmmaking itself “a hobby” and not a professional, profit-seeking endeavor eligible for tax deductions. However, the same judge, Tax Court Judge Diane L. Kroupa, who said during a hearing, “By its very nature, a documentary to me means that it’s not for profit. You’re doing it to educate. You’re doing it to expose,” has now ruled for Storey and against the IRS, who had seeked over a quarter of a million dollars in back taxes from Storey.

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