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Links 1 through 10 of 18803 Chris Yeh's Bookmarks

A leading manufacturer of treadmill desks. They also make a two-person meeting table with bicycling built in.

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Fear of disaster is healthy if it spurs action to prevent it. But élite survivalism is not a step toward prevention; it is an act of withdrawal. Philanthropy in America is still three times as large, as a share of G.D.P., as philanthropy in the next closest country, the United Kingdom. But it is now accompanied by a gesture of surrender, a quiet disinvestment by some of America’s most successful and powerful people. Faced with evidence of frailty in the American project, in the institutions and norms from which they have benefitted, some are permitting themselves to imagine failure. It is a gilded despair.

As Huffman, of Reddit, observed, our technologies have made us more alert to risk, but have also made us more panicky; they facilitate the tribal temptation to cocoon, to seclude ourselves from opponents, and to fortify ourselves against our fears, instead of attacking the sources of them. Justin Kan, the technology investor who had made a halfhearted effort to stock up on food, recalled a recent phone call from a friend at a hedge fund. “He was telling me we should buy land in New Zealand as a backup. He’s, like, ‘What’s the percentage chance that Trump is actually a fascist dictator? Maybe it’s low, but the expected value of having an escape hatch is pretty high.’ ”

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I was entering an America on the verge of a demographic revolution, as a white-majority country began its transition to becoming a white-minority one. Anyone surprised that immigration has become one of the defining political questions of our time should reflect on the numbers and the cultural change. It’s hard to imagine an instance when any other country in human history accepted and then integrated such a massive group of new immigrants from such a spectacular array of cultures in such a short span of time. To see today’s reaction to this as purely a function of crude nativism and foul racism is to miss the much more obvious fact: how well the country has managed to absorb these new immigrants, especially during a period when the easy growth of the postwar years receded to the levels of the past few decades. No other country does this so consistently. No other country could.

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Here’s what Stoicism says will make you happier:
Ask, “What would I recommend if this happened to someone else?”: Take my advice by taking your own advice.
Use the “discipline of assent”: Don’t resist; postpone. Then evaluate. And break bad habits by replacing them.
Make it a treat: Deprive and then savor. When you can’t find a bathroom and then you finally do, that’s happiness.
Do an evening review: Reflect. Forgive. Count your blessings. Show gratitude. (Yes, you can even be grateful for bloggers who read lots of books so you don’t have to.)
If you want to be happy, relationships are key. But all too often we focus on what others should be doing for us. That’s a prescription for frustration.
One of the most fundamental principles in Stoicism is that you need to focus on what you can control. And you can’t control other people. (Okay, maybe you can but those methods result in significant jail time.)

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Trust is built when leaders think clearly about the future and move their organizations to the right place, in terms of product, sales, and people. Do the predictions you make about the future – about the products you should build, the investments you should make, and the changes in competitive or technological landscape – prove to be accurate? And do the people you have chosen to lead in your organization prove to be the right ones? Over time, the answers to these questions become known, and if you answer a lot of these questions correctly, you earn trust. I consider this the “science” of building trust. It’s built on clarity of thought, good communication, and good judgment about people.

The art of building trust is more complicated. It is closely tied with a leader’s ability to communicate with integrity. It is built when you say the right thing at the right time, and show empathy and good judgment. It grows when you stand for ideals bigger than yourself rather than caring primarily about your personal success, wealth, fame, or position. It also grows when you are honest with others, admitting what you don’t know, and not trying to be someone else. This is why you can’t try to copy Steve Jobs or Ed Catmull in your quest to be a great leader. You can only be yourself.

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Vivienne rewrote her op-ed as a short story. An analyst realizes that he's trained an AI to replace him, ends with him going to a Trump rally.

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