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Links 1 through 10 of 18947 Chris Yeh's Bookmarks

In a recent article for The Players’ Tribune, Kobe Bryant discussed his obsession with Allen Iverson, particularly after he dropped 41 on him in a previous game. Kobe studied his every move to gain an advantage. At halftime of the Lakers’ visit to Philadelphia on February 20th, 2000, Iverson had 16 points in the first half while mostly being defended by Derek Fisher, with Kobe in foul trouble.

Phil Jackson gave Kobe the assignment to shut down AI. In this debut episode of Laker Film Room Classic, I take a look at what happened next.

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Complete review of the patents that gave birth to the biotech industry.

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Very very comprehensive.

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There are many ways to center a business. You can be competitor focused, you can be product focused, you can be technology focused, you can be business model focused, and there are more. But in my view, obsessive customer focus is by far the most protective of Day 1 vitality.
Why? There are many advantages to a customer-centric approach, but here’s the big one: customers are always beautifully, wonderfully dissatisfied, even when they report being happy and business is great. Even when they don’t yet know it, customers want something better, and your desire to delight customers will drive you to invent on their behalf. No customer ever asked Amazon to create the Prime membership program, but it sure turns out they wanted it, and I could give you many such examples.
Staying in Day 1 requires you to experiment patiently, accept failures, plant seeds, protect saplings, and double down when you see customer delight. A customer-obsessed culture best creates the conditions where all of that can happen.

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Blockbuster died because someone came along and offered a better user experience. And then someone came along and offered an EVEN BETTER user experience.
I really think that the Netflix of the blogging world is the vast improvement in email servers and publication platforms over the last couple of years.
Seriously: even two years ago, your only real choice was to spend your blog startup funds on hosting and designing a self-hosted blog.
Now? You can spend $29 a month on ConvertKit and get a service that is multitudes sleeker and more robust than the clunky, confusing free MailChimp account most bloggers start with.
ConvertKit will let you build a landing page, if you need one in the beginning. A single page to point people to when you have something you need to tell them. Or sell them. Or sign them up for.
And you can host your content right here on Medium. For free. Right here, where there are already readers. Where there are publications searching for good content to promote. Where you aren’t throwing out blog posts like messages in the bottle, hoping for lightning to strike.

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Users need some level of coherence in new versions of your product. With proper curation, features and changes amplify each other, and lead to a greater customer appreciation of your efforts through a product experience that is more coherent and easier to communicate.

Without curation, software feature prioritization tends to devolve purely into the line-item value of a given feature, rather than how it fits in general with the whole product, or the product release. Great curators won’t think twice about cutting a piece that doesn’t fit the theme of the show, even if it is exceptional.

Designers, not surprisingly, tend to intrinsically understand the value of curation, and valiantly attempt to connect features together into a coherent product experience. Unfortunately, they often are forced to incorporate together a hodge-podge of features that have been prioritized independently by different small teams.

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Viral products tend to have a “lead feature”

In this early interview before Facebook’s IPO, Mark Zuckerberg describes Facebook as:

“Something where you can type someone’s name and find out a bunch of information about them.”

Mark is describing one of Facebook’s features — the ability to view profiles of real people. There is no talk of “social networks” or helping the world to connect to each other. Just a simple and practical description of a key feature of the product.

In 2011, Travis Kalanick described Uber as a mobile app where

“You push a button and in five minutes a Mercedes picks you up and takes you where you want to go.”

Travis doesn’t lead with buzzwords like platform and marketplace. Instead, he focuses on just one button and uses vividly specific language to make the outcome extremely appealing. Today, Uber has further simplified it to “Tap a button, get a ride.”

The format of both descriptions is the same: “You do X and Y happens.” X is the input and Y is the output. This input-output pair matches our intuition about how software works. Simplifying the product as a straightforward input and desirable output creates the sense that it’s an ingenious idea.

Facebook and Uber have thousands of features, yet Mark and Travis elevate a single feature above the others, making the product easy to understand, easy to remember, and, most importantly, easy to talk about.

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I couldn't escape Rachel Dolezal because I can't escape white supremacy. And it is white supremacy that told an unhappy and outcast white woman that black identity was hers for the taking. It is white supremacy that told her that any black people who questioned her were obviously uneducated and unmotivated to rise to her level of wokeness. It is white supremacy that then elevated this display of privilege into the dominating conversation on black female identity in America. It is white supremacy that decided that it was worth a book deal, national news coverage, and yes—even this interview.

And with that, the anger that I had toward her began to melt away. Dolezal is simply a white woman who cannot help but center herself in all that she does—including her fight for racial justice. And if racial justice doesn't center her, she will redefine race itself in order to make that happen. It is a bit extreme, but it is in no way new for white people to take what they want from other cultures in the name of love and respect, while distorting or discarding the remainder of that culture for their comfort. What else is National Geographic but a long history of this practice. Maybe now that I've seen the unoriginality of it all, even with my sister's name that she has claimed as her own, she will haunt me no more and simply blend into the rest of white supremacy that I battle every day.

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The thawb is commonly worn by men in the Arabian Peninsula, Iraq, and other Arab countries in the Persian Gulf. It is normally made of cotton, but heavier materials such as sheep's wool can also be used, especially in colder climates in Iraq and Syria. The style of the thawb varies slightly among the various regions within the Persian Gulf. The sleeves and the collar can be stiffened to give a more formal appearance. Other names may be used for this garment. In Souraqia (Syria) and Oman, dishdasha is the most common word for the garment; in the UAE, the word kandura is used. In Morocco, the sleeves tend to be much shorter so that the thawb may seem more like a long T-shirt and is locally called gandora. The neck also tends to be more open than in its Saudi counterpart and, along with the breast pocket, is often embroidered. It might also lack buttons altogether.

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IMG Academy basketball coach Vince Walden provides instruction on how to effectively get position on the pinch post and get open for an easy jump shot.

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