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Links 1 through 10 of 2900 Chris Breitenbach's Bookmarks

With this understanding, it’s clear why large publishers might be ambivalent towards libraries. This narrow of view of public libraries misses an important dynamic, however. Like the humble starfish that preserves entire marine ecosystems by eating mussels, the American public library is the keystone species in the ecosystem of reading. Without public libraries to promote the culture of reading and build communities of interconnected readers, publishers would face a diminished market for their titles.

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A survey of makerspaces in Illinois

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Ultimately, however, Butler seemed to feel that many library videos would be on relatively firm legal footing: “What the Supreme Court has said is that because they are so strongly transformative, parodies will always present a strong case for fair use regardless of commerciality and other factors that (at the time) were often harmful to the fair use argument. Satire and other non-parodic uses are not banished forever from the fair use kingdom; they just have to be judged contextually, taking into account whether they are non-profit or commercial, the type of work they are using, their effect on the market for the original, and so on. Based on those criteria, I believe plenty of non-commercial videos that borrow elements from pop culture in order to make their own cultural message should be fair use, even if they aren’t clearly parodic.”

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The United States is the country with the highest rate of civilian gun ownership in the world. (The second highest is Yemen, where the rate is nevertheless only half that of the U.S.) No civilian population is more powerfully armed. Most Americans do not, however, own guns, because three-quarters of people with guns own two or more. According to the General Social Survey, conducted by the National Policy Opinion Center at the University of Chicago, the prevalence of gun ownership has declined steadily in the past few decades. In 1973, there were guns in roughly one in two households in the United States; in 2010, one in three. In 1980, nearly one in three Americans owned a gun; in 2010, that figure had dropped to one in five.

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Access Denied documents how for the past decade or so: the federal government has conducted almost no scientific research on how criminals get and misuse guns, or what policies are effective at stopping them; law enforcement has been prohibited from sharing analyses of crime gun trace data with policymakers and the press; and military leaders and doctors have been barred from talking about gun safety to people under their command or care. All of this despite the fact that Americans murder each other with guns at nearly 20 times the rate of residents of other high-income countries.

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The list of simple things that existing gun-violence research can’t answer is quite striking.

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As librarians across the nation struggle with the task of redefining their roles and responsibilities in a digital age, many public libraries are seeing an opportunity to fill the void created by the loss of traditional bookstores. They are increasingly adapting their collections and services based on the demands of library patrons, whom they now call customers.

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If you and your children have been enjoying the Early Literacy iPad Kits along with the iPad mounted in the Children's Library, we have great news!  We recently revamped our kits to include newly acquired apps for you and your children to enjoy! We've also organized the apps, old and new, into convenient folders.

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“Yes!”, says librarian Lauren Smedley, who is in the process of creating what might just be the first maker-space within a U.S. public library. The Fayetteville Free Library where Smedley works is building a Fab Lab — short for fabrication laboratory — that will provide free public access to machines and software for manufacturing and making things.

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