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Links 1 through 10 of 312 by Camryl 9 tagged racism

The architects of equality before the law, or equality of opportunity, knew that it would only allow a few special black people to succeed, and shrugged their shoulders about the rest. As the Reverend Horace James, the former Superintendent of Negro Affairs in North Carolina, said in 1865, “Give the colored man equality, not of social condition, but equality before the law, and if he proves himself the superior of the Anglo Saxon, who can hinder it? If he falls below him, who can help it?” (Side note: lynch mobs were the south’s response to the question who can hinder successful black people.)

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We flatter ourselves, not out of malice, but out of instinct.

Still, we are, in the main, ordinary people living in plush times. ...

This basic extension of empathy is one of the great barriers in understanding race in this country. I do not mean a soft, flattering, hand-holding empathy. I mean a muscular empathy rooted in curiosity. If you really want to understand slaves, slave masters, poor black kids, poor white kids, rich people of colors, whoever, it is essential that you first come to grips with the disturbing facts of your own mediocrity. ...

The answers are out there. But they will not improve your self-esteem.

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To assess attitudes toward race as we approach Obama’s reelection campaign, we analyzed data from one of the most highly regarded academic surveys of political opinion...

All the official statistics point in the same direction: U.S. blacks, on average, have markedly lower incomes than whites. They also have less wealth and significantly higher rates of unemployment. The reasons for these gaps can be debated, but their existence cannot.

Except that a majority of white Americans have no clue, believing that whites’ and blacks’ incomes are “about the same.”

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Forbes magazine has posted a column by Gene Marks, a middle aged white guy, who wants to give advice to poor black kids about how to be successful in America. Of course, these young black kids read Forbes everyday and will internalize his wisdom. There is no poverty porn, noblesse oblige, white paternalism, compassionate conservative masturbation, navel gazing at work here. No. None at all.

...[I don't] know what Gene Marks' intentions were in writing his Forbes' essay. However, I am mighty curious about the intentions of Forbes' editors in publishing such a problematic piece of work.

[See also the comment by Shahryar on Tue Dec 13, 2011 at 05:50:49 PM PST - http://www.dailykos.com/comments/1045077/44253350#c9

--L.]

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In this TEDx talk, Jay flips the coin and talks about how to be an engaged receiver of critique over ideas and actions in the social justice sphere. While he doesn’t get into details about how to get beyond hearing initial feedback to a more give-and-take conversation, I do think his basic tenants of how not to be an ass are damn good reminders to us all.

..."We are not good despite our imperfections, it is the connection we maintain with our imperfections that allows us to be good ..."

[Links to Ill Doctrine, which reportedly doesn't have a transcript yet, but I bet the version on the TED site has a transcript. -L]

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In any other context, we would be shocked at the suggestion that an organization’s religious affiliation should take precedence over an individual’s health care needs. Unfortunately, we have become so accustomed to religious objections to women’s health needs that they can seem commonplace.

It is important to remember, however, that many laws — including those we consider core to America’s values — initially confronted religiously-grounded opposition.

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New York City Police officer Michael Daragjati was casually bragging to a friend about falsely charging a black man with resisting arrest, when, unbeknownst to him, he was recorded saying "I fried another ni--er." He's now been charged with a federal civil rights violation and reignited a conversation about the NYPD's controversial (that's being gentle -- some would say totally racist) stop-and-frisk program: ...

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I was listening to this conversation very intently, in part because their understanding of current perceptions don’t match mine. Finding out what great transition had occurred to demote Madison schools, why on earth they seem to think sending your kid to West high is tantamount to child abuse, was really important to me. They talked about their reasons, but even though I hung on every word, I couldn’t figure out what they were saying.

...I’m starting to read the constant questioning in regards to the Occupy Wall Street movement along the lines of, “What are their goals?” and “What do they hope to accomplish,” as a code for, “I feel okay, why don’t they?” and “They can’t accomplish anything.” ...

[OWS is] a generation waking up to say “What the fuck?” and trying to solve it with conversation and jazz hands.

I’m in such deep wait-and-see mode over the whole thing I’m not even willing to put my current opinions in writing – they’re changing with each new story from a different city. But I will say this: The Occupy Wall Street people are not afraid to name their enemy. They are not afraid to list his crimes. And they are not afraid to confront him directly.

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