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Links 1 through 10 of 82 by Barbara Haven tagged programming

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A giant blog post that will take you through every step from "checking out the code" to "landing the code in the Chromium repo". It will also come in super handy for mild to moderate cases of insomnia. Warning: this is a long post. The bug we're fixing is silly, but will get us writing actual Chromium code.

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R is already a Swiss army knife for data analysis largely due its 6000 libraries but until now it lacked an interface to the Google Analytics API. The release of RGoogleAnalytics library solves this problem.

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If you're a programmer and you don't have visualization as one of your main tools in your belt, then good news, you just found how to easily improve your skill set. Really it should be taught in any programming course. Note: This post won't get you from zero to visualization expert, but hopefully it can pique your curiosity and will provide plenty of references for further study. Visualizing data has two main advantages compared to looking at the same data in a tabular form. 

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Developers these days are spoiled with choice when it comes to selecting an MV* framework for structuring and organizing their JavaScript web apps. Backbone, Ember, AngularJS... the list of new and stable solutions continues to grow, but just how do you decide on which to use in a sea of so many options? To help solve this problem, we created TodoMVC - a project which offers the same Todo application implemented using MV* concepts in most of the popular JavaScript MV* frameworks of today.

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But I really don't think it should have to be that hard to upgrade a CSS framework. Here's what I want to try next time I work in a codebase that's based on Bootstrap:

Do not use the Bootstrap class names directly in our code. They are too short, and it's too hard to keep track of where they're being used.
Instead, use a CSS pre-processor like Less (which Bootstrap itself is based on) to extend the Bootstrap class names and define longer, more app-specific, more semantic class names. For example, we might extend btn into "coursera-generic-button" and we might extend btn/btn-success into "coursera-save-button".
We would then use those custom CSS class names everywhere instead of the Bootstrap class names, especially if we are using them in our JavaScript.
For a longer article that also recommends that technique for semantic more than maintenance reasons, read Stop Embedding Bootstrap Classes in your HTML.

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At Khan Academy we've been investigating teaching Computer Science to students in some new and interesting ways. The most interesting aspect of which is that we're likely going to be teaching them JavaScript as their first language.

We're in a very unique position as we're primarily aiming to teach students who've been through our previous math and science-centric curriculum. Because of this we can create some rather compelling exercises and projects that never would've been feasible otherwise.

The prospect of teaching the JavaScript language as a first language is actually really exciting. Teaching prototypal inheritance to experienced classical-inheritance-using developers is normally rather frustrating (and results in many libraries springing up attempting to replicate the classical style of inheritance in JavaScript, which is a whole realm of weirdness in-and-of itself).

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The key to seeing JavaScript as elegant is understanding its warts, and knowing how to avoid, work around or even exploit them.

I adopted this avoid/fix/exploit approach after reading Doug Crockford's JavaScript: The Good Parts:

Doug has a slightly different and more elaborate take on the bad parts and awful parts, so I'm sharing my perspective on the four issues that have caused me the most grief in the past:

how to fix broken block scope with with;
the four (not three!) meanings of this;
promoting arguments to an array; and
avoiding truthiness.

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