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Links 1 through 10 of 48 by Barbara Haven tagged apple

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"Making the simple complicated is commonplace; making the complicated simple, awesomely simple, that's creativity." - Charles Mingus.

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Joe Wilcox writes: "About five years ago, when blogging as an analyst, I asserted that computing and informational relevance had started shifting from the Windows desktop to cloud services delivered anytime, anywhere and on anything. The day of Windows' reckoning is come: 2010 will mark dramatic shifts away from Microsoft's monopoly to something else. Change is inevitable, and like IBM in the 1980s, Microsoft can't hold back its destiny during this decade. The Windows era is over.

What's surprising: New competition encroaching on Microsoft's Windows territory. Mobile device-to-cloud competition's shifting relevance bears striking similarities to the move from mainframes to PCs, and it is a long, ongoing trend. Microsoft's newer problem is sudden and unexpected: Competing operating systems moving up from smartphones to PCs or PC-like devices. Apple's iPhone OS on iPad is one example.

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Hot on the heels of Steve Jobs’ position paper highlighting all of Flash’s shortcomings, Dean Hachamovitch, Microsoft’s General Manager of Internet Explorer, explained that HTML 5 Video is the future of the web and that IE 9 will only support video playback of content encoded in H.264 video.

H.264 is an industry standard, with broad and strong hardware support. Because of this standardization, you can easily take what you record on a typical consumer video camera, put it on the web, and have it play in a web browser on any operating system or device with H.264 support (e.g. a PC with Windows 7). Recently, we publicly showed IE9 playing H.264-encoded video from YouTube.

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I've got a theory, and it's this: Steve Jobs believes he's gambling Apple's future — the future of a corporation with a market cap well over US $200Bn — on an all-or-nothing push into a new market. HP have woken up and smelled the forest fire, two or three years late; Microsoft are mired in a tar pit, unable to grasp that the inferno heading towards them is going to burn down the entire ecosystem in which they exist. There is the smell of panic in the air, and here's why ...

Brilliant post by @antipopeRSS about end of the PC era http://bit.ly/bxOePm Nice complement to my internet OS piece http://oreil.ly/amhozs – Tim O'Reilly (timoreilly) http://twitter.com/timoreilly/statuses/13147269152

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Fortune's Apple 2.0 reports on Experian's Simmons survey of the top Apple markets in the US. Experian launched the survey in order to predict where consumers were most likely to line up to buy the iPad, and you can see the results above. Besides the list of the 206 most Mac'd out cities, the survey revealed another interesting number: 21.6% of US adults own or use an iPod, iPhone or Mac computer. That's right, one-fifth of Americans own some type of Apple hardware. What's more is that 21.6% doesn't included under-18s -- and how many teens have you seen without an iPod?

Also note that Apple fans tend to stick to urban areas for the most part -- there is a nice big oasis of Mac fans in Colorado and Nevada, but we wonder if the lower population density in those places makes the results a little weird. Also notice the lack of Apple ownership in the south -- Louisiana is not Mac country, apparently.

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As designers, we all have been influenced in some way by Apple, whether it be their brilliant OS, stunning industrial innovation, or the trends they have started in web/application design. Apple focuses a lot on usability. This can be seen in their products, and Apple.com. It is important for Apple.com to be a usable site, because it leaves a good impression on users, and they will therefore be more likely to buy products from Apple.

A lot can be learned from Apple.com, so I will use the website as a case-study to go over some of the most important usability techniques in web design. Whether or not you like Apple.com is your own opinion, but there are still a number of important usability principles on which it is based.

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Here’s the thimbleful of information I have heard regarding The Tablet (none of which has changed in six months): The Tablet project is real, it has you-know-who’s considerable undivided attention, and everyone working on it has dropped off the map. I don’t know anyone who works at Apple who doubts these things; nor do I know anyone at Apple who knows a whit more. I don’t know anyone who’s seen the hardware or the software, nor even anyone who knows someone else who has seen the hardware or software.

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"Earlier this month, Apple rejected an application for the iPhone called Google Voice. The uproar set off a chain of events—Google's CEO Eric Schmidt resigning from Apple's board, and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) investigating wireless open access and handset exclusivity—that may finally end the 135-year-old Alexander Graham Bell era. It's about time.

With Google Voice, you have one Google phone number that callers use to reach you, and you pick up whichever phone—office, home or cellular—rings. You can screen calls, listen in before answering, record calls, read transcripts of your voicemails, and do free conference calls. Domestic calls and texting are free, and international calls to Europe are two cents a minute. In other words, a unified voice system, something a real phone company should have offered years ago.

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It seems unthinkable today — but more than two decades ago, when personal computers were still new and everybody listened to music on a Walkman, Steve Jobs was cast out of Apple. The year was 1985. IBM and Microsoft dominated the world of computing. The revolutionary Macintosh, launched with such fanfare just a year earlier, appeared to be foundering. And Jobs, the guiding force at Apple from the beginning, seemed not just expendable but a threat to the company he’d built. In West of Eden — a national best-seller when it was first published in 1989, now updated in a new edition available on Amazon — Wired contributing editor Frank Rose tells how it went down.

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